Self and Society

Students must complete two sections of HONR 2047 between their second and fourth years. In HONR 2047, students choose from a selection of social science introductory courses that provide a foundation in the language, perspectives, methods, and research approaches of a specific social science discipline.

Note: Students enrolled before Fall 2020- HONR 2048 will satisfy the Self and Society requirements.

Fall 2020 Courses

 


Transitional Justice

 

Professor Maria Restrepo

 

HONR 2047:10 - 3 Credits

CRN: 55516

Time: W 09:00-11:45AM

 

Fulfills: 

  • CCAS: GPAC Social Sciences
  • CCAS: Political Science Major Group C (international politics, law, international organizations) requirement
  • CCAS: Peace Studies Major Group 2 International Peace and Conflict requirement
  • ESIA: Conflict Resolution concentration, Comparative Economic and Social Systems concentration
  • GWSB: Non-Business Elective/Unrestricted Elective
  • SEAS: Social Sciences

 

Course Description: Since the end of the Cold War, peace building interventions have increasingly implemented Transitional Justice (TJ) initiatives. TJ incorporates a dynamic set of multidisciplinary mechanisms adapted to societies transforming themselves after a period of pervasive human rights abuses due to conflict or authoritarian regimes. While definitions of TJ may vary, they all encompass the political, legal and moral dilemmas faced during these transitions. 

The purpose of this course is to: (i) examine and analyze TJ mechanisms including trials, truth commissions, reparations, lustration/vetting, amnesties and memorialization; (ii) investigate normative and political debates raised by TJ processes; (iii) assess the effects and reach of TJ processes; and (iv) discuss real examples stemming from a variety of countries that have experienced huge violations of human rights.


Progress in World Society

 

Professor Michael Barnett

 

HONR 2047: 12 - 3 Credits

CRN 57528

T 03:30PM - 06:00PM

 

Fulfills: 

  • CCAS: GPAC Social Sciences
  • CCAS: Political Science Major Group C (international politics, law, international organizations) requirement
  • CCAS: Peace Studies Major Group 3 Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice requirement
  • ESIA: International Politics concentration
  • GWSB: Non-Business Elective/Unrestricted Elective
  • SEAS: Social Science

 

Course Description: This course will address several four themes in the study of progress in world affairs. One is: What is progress? What is the best case for the existence of progress in world affairs? What are the different ways to conceptualize it? Do you think that the world is getting better and heading in the right direction? Based on what? The second is: What are the causes of progress? Several hundreds of years ago the presumption was that it was directed by the heavens, but since we have tended to give credit to earthly creatures, science and technology, and reason.  The third is: What happens when our belief in progress is shattered? There have been many extraordinary moments in world affairs that have challenged our belief in progress, including World Wars One and Two, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and genocides in Rwanda and Bosnia. How do we make sense of the presence of evil in a story of progress? How does the world respond? Is it possible to respond to evil in a way that restores a sense of progress?


Philosophies of Enmity

 

Professor Ingrid Creppell

 

HONR 2047W:80 - 3 Credits

CRN 57636

T 12:45PM - 03:15PM

 

Fulfills: 

  • WID
  • CCAS: GPAC Social Sciences
  • CCAS: Philosophy majors/minors should consult their departmental advisor
  • GWSB: Non-Business Elective/Unrestricted Elective
  • SEAS: Social Science
  • Equivalent Course: PSC 3192W

 

Course Description: What is enmity? It is not just taking another as a stranger or “other.” Enmity is an extreme and dramatic political mindset, which often deploys forceful and violent action against an adversary. When and why do groups take up this disposition? Throughout history and in widely variant cultures, people have found it necessary to make sense of and justify enmity and struggled with fundamental conundrums in regard to it. We find enmity discussed in religious texts, founding documents, and ethical theories, not just in the reality of war zones. In this course, we will study four major thinkers who constructed approaches to enmity (Aristotle, Hobbes, C. Schmitt, and Hannah Arendt) and bring in additional scholarly works, literature and film to explore the nature of this basic mode of perception/action and its implications for power and meaning.


Race, American Medicine, and Public Health: African-American Experience

 

Professor Vanessa Northington Gamble

 

HONR 2047W:81 - 3 Credits

CRN 57637

MW 12:45PM-02:00PM  

 

Fulfills: 

  • WID
  • CCAS: GPAC Social Sciences
  • GWSB: Non-Business Elective/Unrestricted Elective
  • SEAS: Social Sciences
  • MISPH: Public Health major elective
  • Equivalent Courses: AMST 4702W, HIST 3001W

 

Course Description: This course focuses on the role of race and racism in the development of American medicine and public health by examining the experiences of African Americans from slavery to today.  It will emphasize the importance of understanding the historical roots of contemporary policy dilemmas such as racial and ethnic inequalities and inequities in health and health care. The course will challenge students to synthesize materials from several disciplines to gain a broad understanding of the relationship between race, medicine, and public health in the United States.


Bill of Rights & Criminal Justice

 

Professor Stephen Saltzburg

 

HONR 2047:80 - 3 Credits

CRN 57523

MW 12:45-02:00PM

 

Fulfills: 

  • CCAS: GPAC Social Sciences
  • GWSB: Non-Business Elective/Unrestricted Elective
  • SEAS: Social Sciences
  • Equivalent Course: SOC 2146

 

Course Description: The course will examine many of the powers of law enforcement in America and how they relate to the rights conferred upon suspects and defendants by the U.S. Constitution. It will be a rule-oriented course, with the goal being to educate students about the rules that govern the various players in the criminal justice system and the rights that individuals have when they confront that system. Among the covered subjects are: the authority conferred upon police to stop, arrest, and search – and limits on that authority; the role of the privilege against self-incrimination and confessions in an adversary system; and the roles and responsibilities of prosecutors and defense counsel in the system. 


Holocaust Memory

 

Professor Walter Reich

 

HONR 2047:81 - 3 Credits

CRN 57566

W 3:30-6:00PM

 

Fulfills:

  • CCAS: GPAC Social Sciences
  • CCAS: Upper-level History European Regional requirement
  • ESIA: Comparative, Political, Economic, Social Systems, Conflict Resolution, Contemporary Cultures and Societies, Europe and Eurasia, International Politics, and Security Policy concentrations 
  • GWSB: Non-Business Elective/Unrestricted Elective
  • SEAS: Social Sciences
  • Equivalent Courses: JSTD 2002, IAFF 3190

 

Course Description: The sources, construction, development, nature, uses and misuses of the memory, or public consciousness, of the Holocaust. How different publics in different countries, cultures and societies know, or think they know, about the Holocaust from diaries, memoirs, testimonies, fiction, documentaries, television, commercial films, memorials, museums, the Internet, educational programs and the statements of world leaders—some of them historically accurate and some of them highly distorted. The challenge of representing the Holocaust with fidelity and memorializing its victims with dignity and authenticity. The impact of Holocaust memory on contemporary responses to other genocides and to crimes against humanity. The increasing efforts to use, misuse, abuse, minimize, deny or attack the Holocaust for political, diplomatic, strategic, ideological, anti-Semitic or other purposes. The effectiveness—or lack of effectiveness--of Holocaust memory in teaching the Holocaust’s contemporary “lessons,” especially the vow of “Never again!” The roles of Holocaust memory, and of Holocaust denial or minimization, in international affairs, including in the Middle East in general and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in particular. The psychological, national and diplomatic role of Holocaust memory in Israeli consciousness and behavior. The effects on Holocaust memory of the passage of time since the event. This course uses a cross-disciplinary approach, drawing on the fields of politics, society, ethics, literature, history, cinema, individual testimony, group psychology, social psychology, individual psychology and international affairs.


Reunification, Reconcilitation, and Resentment

 

Professor Alasdair Bowie  

HONR 2047:82 - 3 Credits

CRN 57990

R 12:45-3:15 PM

 

Fulfills: 

  • CCAS: GPAC Social Sciences
  • CCAS: Political Science Group A (Comparative Politics)
  • GWSB: Non-Business Elective/Unrestricted Elective
  • SEAS: Social Sciences
  • Equivalent Course: PSC 2993

 

Course Description: This course focuses on the experiences of countries whose societies have been reunified in the contemporary era after war and separation, such as Germany, post-Vichy France, post-1949 PRC and Vietnam. It explores the strategic design and institutional structure of the reunified country, the various phases of reunification and (in some cases) reintegration, the question of reconciliation (what it means, to whom, how realistic is it), and how societal resentment often parallels official narratives of redemption and national unity. The instructor draws particularly upon his experience of post-war Vietnam, a country divided into a Communist North Vietnam and a non-communist South Vietnam for three decades and two wars, 1946-1976.

 


Global Governance

 

Professor Michael Barnett

HONR 2047:83 - 3 Credits

CRN 58033

TR 11:10AM- 12:25PM

 

Fulfills: 

  • CCAS: GPAC Social Sciences
  • CCAS: Political Science Major Group C (international politics, law, international organizations) requirement
  • ESIA: International Politics, Security Policy, and Conflict Resolution concentrations; International and Comparative Politics Advanced Fundamental course
  • GWSB: Non-Business Elective/Unrestricted Elective
  • SEAS: Social Sciences
  • Equivalent Courses: PSC 2994, IAFF 3190

 

Course Description: This course examines global governance - the creation, revision, and enforcement of the rules that are intended to govern the world.  We will begin by considering the international order that lurks behind and defines any governance arrangement. The purpose of global governance is to create stability in global relations, further collective interests, and pursue the collective good. But is there a tension between a global governance that advances stability and a global governance that aspires to help the public?  If states are the ones responsible for global governance, then wouldn't they produce a global governance that helps the powerful and not the weak. But are states alone in producing global governance? The course also examines the range of different actors that are involved in global governance. Throughout the course we consider these themes in concrete instances of global governance.  I would not be surprised to find some mention of Covid-19.


Ethics in Public Health

 

Professor Jeffrey Spike

HONR 2047:11 - 3 Credits

CRN 58292

M 5:00-7:30PM

 

Fulfills: 

  • CCAS: GPAC Social Sciences
  • Milken: Public Health major/minor elective (only if you have not taken PUBH 3151(W). Please contact your Milken advisor if you have questions.)
  • GWSB: Non-Business Elective/Unrestricted Elective
  • SEAS: Social Sciences

 

Course Description: Public Health may get less glory than medicine, but in the times of a pandemic the truth that "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure" becomes painfully obvious.  We are living in a period defined by a public health crisis. 

 

Public Health is (for that reason) often seen as an important addition to medical training, making an MD/MPH a very popular dual-degree program.  This course will be taught by a philosopher on the faculty at the medical school.    

The course provides a systematic overview of ethical issues pertaining to health care delivery, health promotion, disease prevention and health policy from a public health perspective.  The course will include a survey of ethical issues in public health as well as important ethical issues in health care to which public health can contribute.  These issues range from balancing privacy and surveillance in epidemiology and contact tracing, through environmental racism, climate change, population control, contraception, and abortion, and health system reform.  

Students will learn to recognize the primary features of an ethical problem in public health; become familiar with the language and discourse of public health ethics, including both principles of biomedical ethics and human rights; recognize and analyze the social and cultural dimensions of ethical dilemmas in public health; and formulate a process for preventing and/or resolving ethical conflicts.

Attendance and participation are expected every week.  Some weeks we will show a movie and discuss it in class, including Hollywood dramas and documentaries.


Theories in Political Development

 

Professor Harvey Feigenbaum

HONR 2047.84

CRN 58358

T 6:10-8:00PM

 

**This is a graduate-level course**

 

Fulfills: 

  • CCAS: GPAC Social Sciences
  • CCAS: Political Science Group A (Comparative Politics)
  • GWSB: Non-Business Elective/Unrestricted Elective
  • SEAS: Social Science
  • Equivalent Courses: PSC 2993, PSC 6388

 

Course Description: One of the principal concerns of comparative politics is understanding how and why political systems develop the way they do.  Why do some countries develop into democracies, while others experience various forms of authoritarian rule?  How do factors such as class conflict, timing of industrialization, the nature of the elite, and the influence of political culture affect the development of political institutions?  This course reviews the literature in comparative politics focusing on these concerns.  While most of the cases are drawn from the histories of the advanced industrial states, some attention is also accorded to countries which are currently deemed "underdeveloped".  A brief examination of the problem of nationalism is also included.