Current Openings

Research Assistant Opportunities

Anthropology

Biological Sciences

Chemistry

Economics

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Elliott School of International Affairs

English

Genomics and Precision Medicine

History

International Business

Mathematics

Political Science

Romance, German, and Slavic Languages & Literatures

School of Media and Public Affairs

Speech, Language, and Hearing Studies

Strategic Management and Public Policy

University Writing Program

 

If credit is sought, student must work with faculty to complete the Honors Contract form (pdf). Student will then submit the form to the Honors Program by the deadline for that academic term.


RA Position Descriptions

 

 

 

Professor: Erik Rodriguez

Department: Chemistry

Title: Join the Rodriguez Lab (Chemistry) & perform research to fluorescently
image & treat cancer.

Description: We are looking for freshman or sophomores interested in doing
significant research during their undergraduate studies, including summers
with possible funding.

Three undergraduate positions are available in Spring 2020:
1)      Chemical synthesis of biliverdin analogs & protein modification.
2)      Protein purification & protein nanoparticle synthesis.
3)      Evolution of fluorescent proteins using molecular biology.

Current undergraduate students, JS. Hachey (Chemistry) & WJ. Conlon
(Biology), are available for training during the Spring of 2020 and their
significant research resulted in publications:

1) An, F., Chen, N., Conlon, WJ., Hachey, JS., Xin, J., Aras, O., Rodriguez,
EA., & Ting, R. 2020. “Small ultra-red fluorescent protein nanoparticles as
exogenous probes for noninvasive tumor imaging in vivo.” Int. J. Biol.
Macromol. Accepted Feb. 20, 2020.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2020.02.253

2) Maiti, A., Buffalo,CZ., Saurabh,S., Montecinos-Franjola, F., Hachey, JS.,
Conlon, WJ., Tran, GN., Drobizhev, M., Hughes, TE., Moerner, WE., Ghosh, P.,
Matsuo, H., Tsien, RY., Lin, JY., & Rodriguez, EA. “Crystal structure and
biophysical characterization of the small ultra-red fluorescent protein
evolved from a phycobiliprotein.” Paper in preparation.      Paper includes
two Chemistry Nobel Laureate authors.                           

More papers in the future.

Lab information can be found at https://blogs.gwu.edu/erik_rodriguez/

Duties: 1)      Chemical synthesis of biliverdin analogs & protein modification.
             Synthesize biliverdin molecules and modify protein. Image
molecules on mammalian cell lines using fluorescence microscopy.  Collect and
analyze data.
2)      Protein purification & protein nanoparticle synthesis.
             Purify fluorescent protein and synthesize fluorescent protein
nanoparticles. Image molecules on mammalian cell lines using fluorescence
microscopy.  Collect and analyze data.
3)      Evolution of fluorescent proteins using molecular biology.
             Evolve new classes of fluorescent protein using molecular biology
in E. coli. This will involve random mutagenesis, PCR, subcloning, and
fluorescent protein characterization. Image E. coli and colonies using
fluorescence macroimager and microsopy. Collect and analyze data.

Time commitment: Time commitment is negotiable.  Prefer ≥ 7 h / week. Can be taken has
CHEM4195 or CHEM4195. May be taken as research credit in another Department
with prior approval.  Summer research is available and funding may be
available.

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 3

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to[email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be
met.  Students selected to be research assistants should contact Brianna
Crayton ([email protected]) whether they intend to pursue credit or not.


 

 

 

Professor: Theo Christov

Department: History/Honors/ESIA

Title: Self-Determination

Description: I am looking for a research assistant to assist me in a research
project on the idea of self-determination. The remuneration for this position
is up to $1,500 and available immediately. In asking, How did the
self-determination of a people and nation building come to be seen as
virtually synonymous?, the project seeks to map out the political, legal, and
historical literature on the subject. All interviews will be conducted this
Wednesday, Feb 5.

Duties: The RA job is to research articles, books, and historical data on the
development of self-determination from the 18th century to the present.

Time commitment: 7-9 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be
met.  Students selected to be research assistants should contact Brianna
Crayton ([email protected]) whether they intend to pursue credit or not.

 

 

 

Professor: Luis Ballesteros

Department: International Business

Title: Deglobalization, economic disintegration and firm performance

Description: Multinationalism helps firms access suppliers and consumers
spatially dispersed. It can increase labor productivity (Martin et al. 2017),
administrative capacity (Acemoglu et al. 2007), knowledge spillovers (Alcacer
and Chung 2007, Javorcik 2004), innovation (Knott and Turner 2019), and
foster economies of scale (Alfaro et al. 2018) and competitive advantages
(Berry 2014). A line of research has also associated multinationalism with
risk diversification. Hence, multinational firms cope with shocks better than
domestic firms such as natural disasters (Oetzel and Oh 2014) or financial
crises (Aghion et al. 2016).

The general discourse in which these arguments have flourished and been
tested is the continuous globalization of markets and production. In recent
years, however, antiglobalization processes have resulted in actual or
potential threats to international trade and investment. One can argue that
multinational firms may be more vulnerable than domestic firms to suffer the
consequences of economic disintegration (Boehm 2014). Theoretically, this is
unclear because multinational firms may adjust easier to the closeness of
national markets via reallocation of resources and a higher ability to move
operations to a different country (Alfaro and Chen 2012, Mata and Woerter
2013).

We seek to solve this debate by focusing on the case of Brexit. The Brexit
Referendum in 2016 is not a direct shock to economic integration, but it is a
rise in environmental uncertainty whose effect on the Global Economic Policy
Uncertainty (Baker et al. 2016, Davis 2016)is higher than any other systemic
shock in recent history (see graph). Uncertainty shocks can drop investment,
labor demand, productivity, and growth (Baker and Bloom 2013).


Duties: 1.      Manage research projects by controlling deadlines, monitoring
resources and goal progress, and supervising team members
2.      Being a liaison between the principal investigators and other members of
the research team
3.      Assist in completing administrative tasks related with the research
projects
4.      Conducting library and electronic database research
5.      Produce visual and written research reports for internal and external
distribution
6.      Participate in designated research team meetings


Time commitment: 10 or more hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 3

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be
met.  Students selected to be research assistants should contact Brianna
Crayton ([email protected]) whether they intend to pursue credit or not.
 


 

 

Professor: Hayk Barseghyan


Department: Genomics and Precision Medicine

Title: Identification of mutations responsible for genetic disease

Description: The laboratory is interested in utilization of cutting-edge
genomic technologies/bioinformatics tools in order to identify the underly
genetic cause in a given disorder. These technologies include optical genome
mapping, long/short-read sequencing with utilization of specialized DNA
handling for epigenetic analysis.

Duties: The assistants will be trained in wet lab protocols and expected to
come to the lab at least 2 times a week.
The following are some of the responsibilities:
DNA extraction – regular and high molecular weight
Gel electrophoresis – regular and pulse field
Specific protocols for DNA labeling, genome assembly and variant calling

Time commitment: 7-9 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 4

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be
met.  Students selected to be research assistants should contact Brianna
Crayton ([email protected]) whether they intend to pursue credit or not.


 

 

Professor: Chris Warshaw


Department: Political Science

Title: The Ideological Positions of Democratic and Republican State Party
Platforms in the United States

Description: In this project, I am working with a team of researchers to code
the ideological positions of Democratic and Republican state parties in all
fifty states over the past 50 years using 1,800 individual party platforms
from 1960-2016.  These platforms include the state parties' positions on
dozens of policy issues, including gay rights, abortion, climate change, gun
controls, and many more.  This project will shed new light on the historical
development of party positions.  It will also speak to debates about
polarization and representation (i.e., the links between public opinion and
political parties).

Duties: The research assistant(s) will read Democratic and Republican state
party platforms to help me code the issue positions of Democratic and
Republican state parties in the United States over the past 50 years. They
will code each state party's position on issues like gun control, abortion,
climate change, taxes, women's rights, and many more. This project will give
research assistant(s) the opportunity to learn more about the development of
the American party system. It also give them the opportunity to learn more
about dozens of policy issues, and the positions of political parties on
these issues.

Time commitment: 7-9 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 4

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be
met.  Students selected to be research assistants should contact Brianna
Crayton ([email protected]) whether they intend to pursue credit or not.


 

 

Professor: Imani Cheers


Department: SMPA

Title: Agricultural Apartheid: Land & Water Rights/Reform in South Africa,
Namibia and Palestine

Description: "Agricultural Apartheid is a multimedia virtual reality project
and forthcoming book focusing on
Palestinian, South African and Namibian farmers. The goal is to discuss land
and
water rights issues impacting women living in the aforementioned countries
through cutting edge technology.

Duties: 1.  Conduct and compile background research on each country both
online and at Gelman Library
2. Work at least 2 hours per week at the Library of Congress main reading
library, reviewing materials and identifying pertinent information.
3. Support professor's schedule and maintain appointments pertaining to
research project.

Time commitment: 4-6 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 2

Number of openings: 1

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be
met.  Students selected to be research assistants should contact Brianna
Crayton ([email protected]) whether they intend to pursue credit or not.


 

 

Professor: Kylie Quave

Department: University Writing Program and Anthropology

Title: Data sharing approaches to reconstructing ancient technology

Description: The objective of the Cuzco Archaeological Ceramics Project is to
understand how the Inca state (ca. 1300-1530s CE) impacted local economies in
the heartland of the Inca empire (Cuzco, Peru). This project is a
collaboration between Peruvian and North American researchers and
specialists. Our focus is on ceramic sherds, which have been excavated in
pre-Inca (1000-1400s CE) and Inca archaeological sites in the region of
Cuzco. By studying changes in ceramic style and technology over several
centuries before and during Inca imperialism, we reconstruct how local
peoples interacted with the empire and responded to it, as well as how the
Incas used craft economies (specifically ceramics) to change labor landscapes
and alter daily lifeways.

In Phase 1, my colleagues and I identified excavated sites from which to
sample that would provide a broad cross-section of the Inca heartland in
these periods. Ceramic sherds were drawn (to compare forms and uses of
ceramic vessels) and photographed. We recorded attributes of artistic style
by photographing the sherds themselves, and recorded technological attributes
by taking digital microscope photos of the paste (the interior material) of
each sherd.  These drawings have been partially re-drawn in digital format
and all images have been organized and curated in a private database.

In Phase 2, we will migrate all the drawings, images, and associated metadata
to a public repository such as Harvard Dataverse where other researchers and
lay persons may have access to our database. From that public database, we
will create a survey in which users (both experts in ceramics and others)
will sort images and drawings to create categories of ceramics. We will seek
IRB approval before deploying this survey and will use the results of the
sorting exercise to demonstrate interobserver error among researchers and
others.

In Phase 3, for which we are currently applying for funding, we will use
archaeometric methods (geochemical provenance studies and image-based
granulometry) to differentiate technological traditions among pre-Inca and
Inca ceramics. This final phase will take at least three years and will also
include annual workshops with researchers from Cusco, in which we will
continue to share data, create protocols for future data sharing, and build
consensus about how best to continue studying Inca imperialism through
ceramic sherds.


Duties: The research assistant will be responsible for research related to
digital data management (Phases 1 and 2), data sharing (Phase 2), and some
bibliographic research (preparation for Phase 3). Using Adobe Illustrator,
the RA will complete digital drawings of ceramics rim shapes and maintain the
organization of the files. The RA will also use Harvard Dataverse or a
comparable repository to design and build a database of project files that
may be publicly shared, with metadata attached to all files. Once the
database is composed, the RA will design and construct an online survey that
includes images, using an open source platform such as Google Surveys.
Finally, the RA will conduct library-based research on granulometry and the
use of JMicrovision for analyzing ceramic technologies. They will annotate
the bibliographic citations.

The preference is for a candidate with knowledge of coding and JSON who can use
the Dataverse API: http://guides.dataverse.org/en/latest/api/native-api.html.
The RA should also be able to conduct library-based research.

I am seeking one RA for 7+ hours per week, two RAs for 4-6 hours per week, or three RAs for 1-3 hours per week.

Time commitment: 4-6 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 2

Number of openings: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be
met.  Students selected to be research assistants should contact Brianna
Crayton ([email protected]) whether they intend to pursue credit or not.

 


 

 

Professor: Harris Mylonas

Department: Political Science

Title: Greek and Cypriot Political Developments

Description: Conduct background research for the report on Greece that I contribute annually to the European Journal of Political Research.

Duties: Summarize events, find reliable sources to cite, edit text. 

Time commitment: 1-3 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 1

Number of openings: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be
met.  Students selected to be research assistants should contact Brianna
Crayton ([email protected]) whether they intend to pursue credit or not.

 


Professor: Arie Dubnov

Department: History
 
Project Title: Arab-Jews? History of Jewish Sephardi communities and the making of Mizrahi Identity in Israel
 

Description: All too often, modern Jewish history is seen through an Ashkenazi lens. That is: there is a tendency to understand Jewish history as the story of Jews originating from Western European countries (Germany, France) and Eastern European regions (Yiddish speaking Jews from Poland, Romania, Lithuania, Galicia, Russia), including their various migration patterns (to Israel most prominently to the USA).

In recent decades, growing attention has been afforded to the story of the Jewish diaspora communities that were left out of this grand narrative. This list includes the various Sephardi Jewish communities (descendants of those expelled from Spain) who spoke Judaeo-Spanish (Ladino), the various Jewish communities in Arab and Middle Eastern countries who spoke Arabic, Farsi, and Aramaic, Yemenite Jews and Jews in Northern Africa under French colonial rule, and the Jews in the Balkans and the Ottoman Empire (including the Sephardi communities in Palestine before the emergence of Zionism). The term "Mizrahi" (literally "Oriental") Jew emerged in mandatory Palestine as a result of the encounter between Ashkenazi Zionist immigrants and their "Eastern" brethren, and it remained a charged term ever since. During the 1960s, a new generation of social activists, inspired by Civil Rights struggles in the USA and elsewhere, reasserted their identity as Mizrahi as a source of pride, fighting against the prevailing pejorative cultural connotations that the term carried and against state discrimination. Other non-Ashkenazi authors and intellectuals began describing themselves as "Levantines" or "Arab-Jews." Simultaneously, the emergence of Shas, an Israeli Sephardi-Orthodox party, revealed different paths of reasserting non-Ashkenazi identity.

In Spring 2020, I will launch a new class dedicated to these subjects. The class will run in tandem with the project "Jews in the Muslim World: Histories, Memories, and Narratives" and is connected to a larger research project done in collaboration with colleagues at Penn State University. 

The aim of the course is twofold, and it would be divided into two parts accordingly. First, I would like to provide the student with a broad overview of the history of the major Sephardi communities in modern times, leaping from Salonica to Baghdad, Algiers to Teheran, Istanbul to Tunisia. Second, we will explore the history of Mizrahi Jews who immigrated to Israel and represent a significant part of Israeli society. We will revisit their rich history and culture, and examine the ways Ashkenazi-Mizrahi relations shaped Israeli culture and continue to be a source of tension in Israeli society and politics. Next to critical events in the Mizrahi struggle for equality (such as the 1959 Wadi Salib Revolt, the Black Panthers Movement in the 1970s, and more), we will explore literature, film and television to uncover the way Mizrahi Jews narrate their story in Israel today. Most significantly, the class will include several guest lecturers that would allow contemporary scholars and activist to present their analysis and personal accounts using their own words.

Duties: 

The Research Assistant (RA) will help Prof. Dubnov develop the class, and prepare, schedule, and conduct these pre-recorded interviews and guest lectures.

The main tasks will include:

  1. Primary Sources: Assist the professor in locating essential primary resources (historical documents, speeches, excerpts from novels, and more) that are available in English translation. 
  2. Secondary Sources: Identify and survey historiography (historical literature) and relevant secondary literature on the subject.
  3. Curate Online-contents: Find podcasts, recordings, and videos on the subject that are available online that could be used for the class.
  4. Contact and Scheduling: Communicating with the guest lecturers and schedule recording sessions.
  5. Recording/Interviewing: Assist Prof Dubnov in conducting interviews/record guest lectures (on Zoom or WebEx) with the guest speakers.
  6. Video Editing: Minor editing of the recorded videos, and upload them to an online platform (Blackboard as well as a personalized YouTube channel that will be prepared for the class, and continue serving as a resource afterward).

Required skills:

  • Good oral and written communication skills.
  • Integrity and professionalism.
  • Familiarity with JSTOR and researching online databases.
  • Familiarity with Dropbox, Google Drive, and YouTube (video editing).
  • Basic video editing skills (software such as WeVideo or similar).

Knowledge of Hebrew, Ladino, and/or Israeli culture is not required.

Note: I'd be delighted to find a student interested in this topic who loves working on the intersection of history, culture, and literature. I am open to the possibility of an independent study, which would allow the student to gain extra credit.

Time commitment: Flexible, estimated between 2-3 hrs. per week.

Credit hour option*: Flexible

Number of openings: 1

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

 

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be
met.  Students selected to be research assistants should contact Brianna
Crayton ([email protected]) whether they intend to pursue credit or not.


 

 

Professor: Theo Christov

Department: History

Title: The Reception of Emer Vattel's Works in Modern International Relations
and International Law

Description: The goal for this project is to trace the influence of the 18th
century political thinker Emer Vattel on the development of international
relations and international law in the 20th century. Particular attention
will be paid on the following questions: the idea of a just war, birthright
citizenship, diplomatic exchange, and the law of nations. For anyone
interested in the history of political thought and ideas, or the development
of international law and international relations in the 20th century, this
project would be ideal. the ultimate goal is to assist with writing an
article (for an edited volume under contract with Cambridge University
Press).

Duties: The role of the research assistant will be to compile a list of
sources, primarily articles and book chapters on the topic, before providing
a brief summary of each. The use of analytical skills to distill through
various sources of information and systematize themes of Vattel's influence
on the conduct of international relations.

Time commitment: 4-6 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 2

Number of openings: 1

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be
met.  Students selected to be research assistants should contact Brianna
Crayton ([email protected]) whether they intend to pursue credit or not.


 

 

Professor: Graciela Kaminsky

Department: Economics

Title: Two Hundred Years of Financial Globalization

Description: This project compares two episodes of financial globalization.
The first episode started with the end of the Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815).
The end of these wars fueled a reduction of public spending and a bonanza in
international lending as interest rates in England and France sharply
declined.  This episode ended with the Great Depression in 1931.  It is at
the onset of the Great Depression that governments around the world erected
barriers to capital mobility in their effort to eliminate volatility in
financial markets.  International capital markets basically disappeared.
The second episode of financial globalization restarted with the collapse of
the Bretton Woods System in the early 1970s.   As exchange rates started to
fluctuate, governments around the world could implement an independent
monetary policy without the need of capital controls.  Controls on capital
mobility were abandoned and international capital flows restarted.
This project examines the characteristics of international capital flow booms
and busts in these two episodes of financial globalization.  Are capital
flows becoming more unstable?  Do all capital flow bonanzas end in financial
crises?  Do Central Banks in the financial center fuel volatility in capital
flows to the periphery?  What type of shocks trigger turmoil in international
capital markets?
The project involves the creation of two databases for the first episode of
financial globalization.  For the first database, students collect
information on international capital flows using data on bonds and shares
issued in the financial centers of that time: London, Paris, Berlin, Hamburg,
Frankfurt, and New York.  For the second database, students collect data on
prices of government bonds in the financial centers and data on a variety of
news using the digital collection of the London Times and the Economist
during the 19th century and early 20th century.



Duties: Students may be involved in the creation of the two databases.  The
data on bonds and shares issued in the financial centers as well as the data
on prices of government bonds is in photos taken in archives.  The data on
economic, political, and financial news is collected from the London Times
(for the years 1820 to 1842) and from the Economist (for the years 1843 to
1931).  Students will work under the supervision of faculty and periodical
meetings will be set to help the students in their work.



Time commitment: 10 or more hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be
met.  Students selected to be research assistants should contact Brianna
Crayton ([email protected]) whether they intend to pursue credit or not.


 

 

Professor: Ahmed Louri


Department: Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Title: High-performance, Power-efficient, and Reliable Computer Architecture
Design

Description: High performance computing architectures and technologies
(HPCAT) lab, led by Prof. Ahmed Louri, is a world-class research laboratory.
HPCAT lab investigates novel parallel computer architectures and technologies
which deliver high reliability, high performance, and energy-efficient
solutions to important application domains and societal needs. The research
has far-reaching impacts on the computing industry and society at large.
Current research projects include: (1) the use of machine learning techniques
for designing energy-efficient, reliable multicore architectures, (2)
scalable accelerator-rich reconfigurable heterogeneous architectures, (3)
emerging interconnect technologies (photonic, wireless, RF, hybrid) for
network-on-chips (NoCs) & embedded systems, (4) future parallel computing
models and architectures including Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs), Deep
Neural Networks (DNNs), near data computing, approximate computing, and (5)
cloud and edge computing.

Duties: A research assistant is expected, on a routine basis, to be able to:
(1)     perform administrative and research tasks under the direction of faculty
member or senior research assistants;
(2)     assist with experiments, simulations, and coding;
(3)     perform literature searches, review content, and prepare written
summaries;
(4)     prepare drafts for articles, reports, or presentations.

Time commitment: 10 or more hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 0

Number of openings: 3

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be
met.  Students selected to be research assistants should contact Brianna
Crayton ([email protected]) whether they intend to pursue credit or not.

 


 

 

Professor: Jozef Przytycki


Department: Mathematics

Title: Knot Theory, assisting in editing, programming,  and research

Description: Knot Theory is a discipline of modern mathematics, part of
topology (geometria situs). Student(s) will assist me with editing programing and
doing research in Knot Theory.

Duties: Students under my supervision will be involved in tasks as below:

1. Student would assist in preparing/editing research paper for arXiv
submission (and eventual publication). Student has to learn LaTeX and how to
draw figures in xfig or other similar
program.

2. Many invariants of graphs and knots require pattern testing which require
to wrote simple (or not that simple) programs. Also programs are needed to
analyze simple algebraic structures related to knots.

I assume student would assist me 4-6 hours a week (2 credit) but I am
flexible, so more, or less is possible.

Time commitment: 4-6 hours per week (average)

Note: 2 openings!


Credit hour option*: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be
met.  Students selected to be research assistants should contact Brianna
Crayton ([email protected]) whether they intend to pursue credit or not.


 

 

Professor: Alex Pyron

Department: Biological Science

Title: Species Delimitation in Desmognathus Salamanders

Description:
The Dusky Salamanders, genus Desmognathus, are one of the most diverse and
abundant animals in the eastern forests of the United States. They are
classic study organisms for ecology and behavior. Despite their visibility
and imperilment, we know little about their genetic diversity and
evolutionary history. While there are only 21 currently named species, recent
work using DNA sequencing has revealed at least 45 potential species, which
would more than double the size of the group.


Duties: The research assistant will work with me to collect data and build a
computational model to distinguish between cryptic species of Desmognathus
salamander. Classes in ecology/evolution and experience with statistics are a
plus.

Time commitment: 1-3 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 1

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be
met.  Students selected to be research assistants should contact Brianna
Crayton ([email protected]) whether they intend to pursue credit or not.

 


 

 

Professor: David Mitchell

Department: English

Title: Disposable Humanity (feature-length documentary film)

Description: "Disposable Humanity" consists of three story strands that
create a braid across history and culture in relationship to disabled people
and their treatment in Nazi Germany during World War II and into the present.
The film will: 1) document the Nazi medical mass murder of 300,000+ “mental
patients” in psychiatric institutions (referred to as Aktion T4); 2)
examine the growing efforts in Germany and elsewhere (including the United
States, Poland, Austria, Czech Republic, and Italy) to commemorate and
memorialize the victims; 3) explore the history of our personal family
journeys undertaken as disabled people to visit these memorial sites since
the late 1990s.  Thus, the planned film will interweave history, culture, and
disability experience into its effort to make visible a forgotten and/or
erased aspect of Holocaust history.

Duties: Research assistants will assist with tracking down key historical
documents, photos, film clips, permissions related to the illustration of key
documentary film themes, topics, and interview b-roll materials. Each
assistant will be given a key theme to track down the best illustrative
documents -- for instance, one RA might watch all of the propaganda films
created around the sterilizations and, ultimately, murder of disabled people
institutionalization during World War II, select best clips to illustrate
ideas, and track down appropriate permissions related to the use of desired
materials in the final documentary film.  Another student would transcribe
remaining interview transcripts and analyze the interview discussions with
respect to key themes covered (grass roots preservation of historical T4
locations, selection process, memorialization efforts, reparations advocacy
efforts, etc.). A third RA would research key documents such as photos of
Himmler visiting the first gassing facility at Poznan, Poland, Medical
meldobogen forms for gassing selections in Berlin, biographical victim data
available on websites (for example, gedenkort-T4.com; YadVashem.org),
physician and medical personnel trial transcripts and photos/film, etc. The
objective is to employ students in important archival work that goes into the
crafting of a feature-length film documentary

Number of Openings: 3

Time commitment: 4-6 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be
met.  Students selected to be research assistants should contact Brianna
Crayton ([email protected]) whether they intend to pursue credit or not.


 

 

Professor: Yvonne Captain

Department: RGSLL

Title: " 'African' Surnames in the Americas"

Description: The project concerns research on families with last names that
date from trans-Atlantic slavery and carry on until the present day in both
the United States and in Latin America.  Family Names like Senegal, Congo,
Africano, and Angola are far more common than most people assume.  Through
personal interviews, data collection in various sources, information on the
families is garnered.  A series of questions are communicated, typically in
person, to each of the interviewees in order to see what the Brazilian,
Colombian, and U.S. families have in common as we draw conclusions related to
the African Diaspora.

Duties: The 1st student will input raw data as it already exists into the
database, and if there is time, will help the professor with research that
contributes to further data.  Student will also help maintain contact with
the professor's  co-investigator colleagues in Brazil and Colombia.
The 2nd student will aid in analyzing Excel queries that are already set up
by the professor and that will be further enhanced by student #1.  Some
knowledge of databases beyond beginning status-or the willingness to
learn is best for student #2
While no knowledge of the Spanish or Portuguese languages is necessary, it
does not hurt!
If either student prefers to work on a non-credit basis, we can consult with
the Honors Program to see what the best option is.

Time commitment: 4-6 hours per week (average) or 7-9 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 2 or 3 credits

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be
met.  Students selected to be research assistants should contact Brianna
Crayton ([email protected]) whether they intend to pursue credit or not.


 

 


Professor: Sanjay Patnaik

Department: Strategic Management and Public Policy

Title: Business strategy, climate change and corporate political activities

Description: Climate change is expected to be one of the greatest challenges
for mankind in the coming century. It is therefore imperative to study
possible solutions to address this important issue, both from a public policy
and a business perspective. For my research project, we will analyze newly
introduced climate change regulations (such as the European Union and the
Californian cap-and-trade programs) to study how effective these programs
are, how they affect firm strategy and performance and how they can be
improved to achieve the best results. This research effort is a complex
project that will include work on a variety of topics related to climate
change and is therefore ideally suited for any student who wants to learn
more about this essential issue. Students will have the chance to participate
in cutting edge research in an area of study that is increasingly becoming
important all over the world.

Duties: The duties for students will involve a range of tasks, including
collecting, reformatting and preparing data, conducting background research
(i.e. literature searches, scanning newspaper articles, web searches etc.),
basic data analysis (mostly excel), (possibly) some basic statistical
analyses (which I will train students in if needed) and exploring new data
sources.  The projects will include working on company data on international
and US firms, on greenhouse gas emissions and on data from international
organizations such as the United Nations. Students will also be working with
standard databases commonly used in business and finance (e.g. Orbis,
Amadeus, etc.).

Note: There are 3 openings!


Time commitment: 7-9 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 3

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be
met.  Students selected to be research assistants should contact Brianna
Crayton ([email protected]) whether they intend to pursue credit or not.

 


 


Professor: Diego Abente Brun

Department: Elliott School of International Affairs

Title: The Foreign of Brazil: From the Discourse to the Facts

Description: This project consists of following up the foreign policy
decisions and positions of the Bolsanaro government and explore the
congruence/incongruence between words and deeds. Especial emphasis will be
paid to relations with Argentina. It implies also to compare and contrast his
government's foreign policy with that of previous governments and includes
the analysis of the role of key institutions, chiefly Itamaraty, but also
private actors such as business associations, the Congress, civil society
organizations and the media.


Duties: 1. To identify key issue-areas.( In close consultation with the
Instructor)
2.  To collect data and review the literature. (Portuguese and Spanish
reading language proficiency required)
3. To trace and underline the difference and similarities with previous
official positions.
4. To explore the likely course of events in the future.
5. To conclude with a summary of the key findings, the risks and
opportunities they offer, and policy recommendations for other foreign actors
such as the United States, Europe,  and regional actores.
6. The project will be discussed with the instructor and may be adjusted
based on the student's interests.

Time commitment: 4-6 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be
met.  Students selected to be research assistants should contact Brianna
Crayton ([email protected]) whether they intend to pursue credit or not.


 

 

Professor: Holly Dugan

Department: English

Title: The Famous Ape

Description: My current book project, “The Famous Ape” argues that there
is much to learn about our history from studying how we’ve treated our
closest animal relatives: apes. In it, I trace the simian celebrities
renowned in their own time period for aping our best and worst qualities,
many of whom paid dearly for having such skills. My title comes from
Hamlet’s odd allusion in that play’s famous closet scene, an allusion
that is as confusing as it is intriguing. In it, Hamlet warns his mother not
to be “like the famous ape,” who sought “to try conclusions."  Despite
Hamlet’s specificity (he uses the definite article) and his conviction that
the lessons of this example are well known, no one seems to know a thing
about the so-called “famous” ape. Gertrude leaves the scene convinced of
Hamlet’s madness, and most critics do, too. My book takes a different
approach, addressing that absence directly by seeking to trace the forgotten
history of various “famous apes” from the sixteenth to the twentieth
century, all of whom were quite well known in their own time, and who were
used to “try” conclusions about human and animal boundaries, but who are
now mostly forgotten and excluded from our histories of modernity.

Because I've found more examples than I can address in the book, I am
building a public humanities website to share this information, which is
comprised of brief biographies of each "famous ape." My hope is that in
seeing the repetition latent in these histories and by learning more about
these creatures as individuals, readers will come to their own ethical
conclusions about these entertainment practices.

Duties: All that's needed is a willingness to learn more about historical
research and animal history.

Research tasks may include 1. primary research in newspaper archives of the
19th and 20th century (depending on students' skills & interest); managing a
public-facing humanities research account linked to the project (ie,
summarizing research and drafting content for blog posts; strategizing about
promotion across platforms; acquiring image rights); building/maintaining
research database.

Time commitment: 1-3 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 1

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be
met.  Students selected to be research assistants should contact Brianna Crayton ([email protected]) whether they intend to pursue credit or not.


 

 

Professor: James Mahshie

Department: Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences

Title: Research on communication abilities of children with cochlear implants

Description: The goal of work in my lab is to better understand a range of
abilities exhibited by children with hearing loss who use cochlear implants.
The research addresses questions associated with speech production, speech
perception and literacy. Work involves obtaining speech samples from children
for analysis, along with a range of related measures that inform us about
listening experience, social economic status, residual hearing, etc.

NOTE: Dr. Mahshie will be away in the Fall semester and is looking for
someone in the Spring.


Duties: 1.      Designing and running experiments; Recruiting participants
2.      Participating in data collection
3.      Analysis of data, including transcription
4.      Maintaining lab paperwork including IRB protocols
5.      Maintaining lab equipment.


Time commitment: 4-6 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 1

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be
met.  Students selected to be research assistants should contact Brianna
Crayton ([email protected]) whether they intend to pursue credit or not.