Current Openings

Research Opportunities for Honors Students

Positions are sorted by faculty home department. You do not need to have a major or minor in their department or school to apply. 

Anthropology
Biological Sciences
Economics
Electric Engineering and Computer Engineering
Elliott School of International Affairs
English
Geography
Health Policy and Management 
History
International Business
Mathematics
Music
Political Science
Psychological and Brain Sciences
Romance, German, and Slavic Languages & Literatures
School of Media and Public Affairs
Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences
Tratchenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration
University Writing Program

 

Receiving Academic Credit

Students can receive academic credit for a research assistantship by submitting an Honors Contract by the designated academic term deadline. For academic credit in Fall 2021, the deadline to submit an Honors contract is Friday, September 24th by 5pm. For more information on Honors contracts, click here or contact a Program Manager.

 

RA Position Descriptions

Professor: Ellen Yeung

Department: Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences

Title: Investigation of the Relationship between Substance Use and Pain

Description: Approximately 1 in 5 Americans, suffer from severe and/or
persistent pain. Substance use/misuse and chronic pain frequently co-occur.
Multiple studies have revealed an association between them showing the onset
of substance use/misuse precedes people’s reports of chronic pain in some
populations, and vice versa in other populations. You may wonder why this is
the case. Do current substance users or people with a history of substance
use/misuse show higher pain sensitivity? Do they report a heightened
analgesic effect that in turn leads to greater likelihood of self-medication
with alcohol, tobacco, cannabis, or opioids? Would chronic pain patients who
rate higher on certain personality traits and/or loneliness be more at risk
of substance use disorders? Do these devastating health conditions manifest
similar physiological dysregulation that has been implicated in the brain
reward and stress pathways? If you are interested in seeking answers to these
questions, please consider joining my scientific effort to help people manage
their substance use and chronic pain. I am recruiting conscientious and
motivated undergraduate students to work as research assistants in my lab.

Duties: In this role, you will gain experience in recruiting and interviewing
participants in the community, preparing and administering study materials,
and managing electronic diary studies. Furthermore, during research assistant
training, we will discuss theories of substance use disorders and chronic
pain, as well as the research methodology and statistical techniques that
allow us to address the research questions relevant to their co-occurrence.
Together, we will review the literature, develop and organize a digital
library, and code the research studies. In the future, when in person
training is permitted, you will have the opportunity to get an insider's look
at, and hands-on experience with, the process of assessing several
physiological indices via state-of-the-art equipment and software. In short,
you will gain important research skills highly valued in graduate and medical
programs, while making a meaningful contribution to the accumulation of
knowledge on substance use and chronic pain.

Time commitment: 6-8 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 2

Number of openings: 3

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.


Professor: Declan Cullen

Department: Geography

Title: Automated Vehicles and Smart City policy in Washington D.C.

Description: This project corresponds with a chapter in book project I am
currently working on with two colleagues. The book examines how "Big Tech"
influences urban politics, urban policy, and urban futures. Through the lens
of Uber it examines how tech companies transform cities and what that means
for urban life.

Duties: The research assistant will aid in collecting relevant media
reporting on the topic of autonomous vehicles in Washington D.C. They will
also do a policy analysis of existing legislation on Autonomous Vehicles and
examine the minutes and meetings of the Mayor's Autonomous Vehicles Working
Group.

Time commitment: 1-3 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 1

Number of openings: 1

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.


Professor: Janet Lewis

Department: Political Science

Title: Rebel Group Formation in Africa

Description: Because the clandestine, initial phases of insurgency typically
leave just a faint trace in news reports and thus in conflict datasets, most
systematic conflict research examines conflicts only after rebel groups have
already formed and committed substantial violence. This project aims to
builds a dataset of dozens of African rebel groups – as close as possible
to a complete list of contemporary rebel organizations (formed since 1997)
that have committed at least one act of violence against an African state –
which allows for systematic analysis of rebel group formation there. The
dataset is near completion; the RAs will complete the research and conduct
spot checks of previously-collected data to ensure clarity of supporting
materials for future researchers who will use the dataset.

Duties: 1) Identifying sources of information about rebellion in Africa and
analyzing them. especially by applying criteria laid out in a detailed
codebook.
2) Reading and revising prior RA's documentation in support of their codings
to ensure accuracy and clarity.

Throughout, the RAs will need to be independent and detail-oriented. They
will learn a great deal about the initial phases of rebellion in Africa, and
about the process of building a dataset.

Time commitment: 7-9 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.


Professor: Shirley Graham

Department: Elliott School of International Affairs

Title: Military Gender Advisors and GEIA Student

Description: There are two projects currently requiring strong
researchers/honors students in the Gender Equality Initiative in
International Affairs (GEIA) at the GW, Elliott School.
1. US Military Gender Advisors, discussing the opportunities and barriers to
them delivering their programs on gender equality within the security sector
in fragile contexts. This project uses qualitative research methodologies
such as narrative analysis and grounded theory. The outcome of this research
will be the content for an academic peer-reviewed journal article and for
presentation at the ISA Conference in 2021. The project is beginning November
2020 and will complete April 2021.

Duties: 1. US Military Gender Advisor Research. Transcribe interviews and
support PI with analysis and writing of research report.

Time commitment: 1-3 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 1

Number of openings: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to[email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.


Professor: Arie Dubnov

Department: History

Project Title: Arab-Jews? History of Jewish Sephardi communities and the making of Mizrahi Identity in Israel

Description:

All too often, modern Jewish history is seen through an Ashkenazi lens. That is: there is a tendency to understand Jewish history as the story of Jews originating from Western European countries (Germany, France) and Eastern European regions (Yiddish speaking Jews from Poland, Romania, Lithuania, Galicia, Russia), including their various migration patterns (to Israel most prominently to the USA).

In recent decades, growing attention has been afforded to the story of the Jewish diaspora communities that were left out of this grand narrative. This list includes the various Sephardi Jewish communities (descendants of those expelled from Spain) who spoke Judaeo-Spanish (Ladino), the various Jewish communities in Arab and Middle Eastern countries who spoke Arabic, Farsi, and Aramaic, Yemenite Jews and Jews in Northern Africa under French colonial rule, and the Jews in the Balkans and the Ottoman Empire (including the Sephardi communities in Palestine before the emergence of Zionism). The term "Mizrahi" (literally "Oriental") Jew emerged in mandatory Palestine as a result of the encounter between Ashkenazi Zionist immigrants and their "Eastern" brethren, and it remained a charged term ever since. During the 1960s, a new generation of social activists, inspired by Civil Rights struggles in the USA and elsewhere, reasserted their identity as Mizrahi as a source of pride, fighting against the prevailing pejorative cultural connotations that the term carried and against state discrimination. Other non-Ashkenazi authors and intellectuals began describing themselves as "Levantines" or "Arab-Jews." Simultaneously, the emergence of Shas, an Israeli Sephardi-Orthodox party, revealed different paths of reasserting non-Ashkenazi identity.

In Spring 2020, I will launch a new class dedicated to these subjects. The class will run in tandem with the project "Jews in the Muslim World: Histories, Memories, and Narratives" and is connected to a larger research project done in collaboration with colleagues at Penn State University.

The aim of the course is twofold, and it would be divided into two parts accordingly. First, I would like to provide the student with a broad overview of the history of the major Sephardi communities in modern times, leaping from Salonica to Baghdad, Algiers to Teheran, Istanbul to Tunisia. Second, we will explore the history of Mizrahi Jews who immigrated to Israel and represent a significant part of Israeli society. We will revisit their rich history and culture, and examine the ways Ashkenazi-Mizrahi relations shaped Israeli culture and continue to be a source of tension in Israeli society and politics. Next to critical events in the Mizrahi struggle for equality (such as the 1959 Wadi Salib Revolt, the Black Panthers Movement in the 1970s, and more), we will explore literature, film and television to uncover the way Mizrahi Jews narrate their story in Israel today. Most significantly, the class will include several guest lecturers that would allow contemporary scholars and activist to present their analysis and personal accounts using their own words.

Duties:

The Research Assistant (RA) will help Prof. Dubnov develop the class, and prepare, schedule, and conduct these pre-recorded interviews and guest lectures.

The main tasks will include:

1.   Primary Sources: Assist the professor in locating essential primary resources (historical documents, speeches, excerpts from novels, and more) that are available in English translation.

2.   Secondary Sources: Identify and survey historiography (historical literature) and relevant secondary literature on the subject.

3.   Curate Online-contents: Find podcasts, recordings, and videos on the subject that are available online that could be used for the class.

4.   Contact and Scheduling: Communicating with the guest lecturers and schedule recording sessions.

5.   Recording/Interviewing: Assist Prof Dubnov in conducting interviews/record guest lectures (on Zoom or WebEx) with the guest speakers.

6.   Video Editing: Minor editing of the recorded videos, and upload them to an online platform (Blackboard as well as a personalized YouTube channel that will be prepared for the class, and continue serving as a resource afterward).

Required skills:

•       Good oral and written communication skills.

•       Integrity and professionalism.

•       Familiarity with JSTOR and researching online databases.

•       Familiarity with Dropbox, Google Drive, and YouTube (video editing).

•       Basic video editing skills (software such as WeVideo or similar).

Knowledge of Hebrew, Ladino, and/or Israeli culture is not required.

Note: I'd be delighted to find a student interested in this topic who loves working on the intersection of history, culture, and literature. I am open to the possibility of an independent study, which would allow the student to gain extra credit.

Time commitment: Flexible, estimated between 2-3 hrs. per week.

Credit hour option*: Flexible

Number of openings: 1

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.


Professor: Iris Malone

Department: Political Science/International Affairs

Title: Mapping Militants

Description:  
The project focuses on researching and writing short profiles about the history and evolution of contemporary militant groups in the United States and around the world. Students are tasked with researching information about the group’s formation, organizational structure, ideological goals, and ties with other militant actors using a codebook, sample cases, and open-source online resources. Students then write short historical narratives about each militant group to trace its history and key facts.

The profiles will be used in two ways. First, they will help the professor in an ongoing project to understand the causes of militant group formation and how organizational features affect violent dynamics. Second, they will be
used to identify and facilitate the creation of more in-depth profiles for publication on the Mapping Militants Project website. The latter receives approximately 35,000 website hits per month and is routinely cited by academics, journalists, and policy-makers.


Duties: 

  • Research contemporary militant groups in the United States and around the world using a combination of open-source intelligence resources, think tank reports, books, scholarly journals, news articles, and existing conflict datasets
  • Identify, where possible, approximately two dozen pieces of historical information across five different issue areas for each assigned militant group
  • Write short 1-2 page encyclopedic profiles summarizing the history and evolution of each militant group. Summarize and contextualize different campaign dynamics in relation to country-level events
  • Meet with professor regularly to review progress, discuss cases, and make any necessary revisions.


Time commitment: 4-6 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 2

Number of openings: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.


Professor: Melissa Keeley

Department: Geography

Title: Public Perceptions of Green Infrastructure and Sustainability in DC and Philadelphia

Description: My research broadly is on urban sustainability, and specifically
looks at new responses that cities are taking to challenges such as climate
change. Increasingly, cities are recognizing that "green infrastructure"
(that is street trees, green roofs, permeable pavements, parks, rain gardens)
can help with multiple problems simultaneously--like managing stormwater,
reducing the urban heat island effect, providing habitat to wildlife, and
improving the quality of life for city residents. For these reasons, green
infrastructure has been identified as a sustainability best practice.
However, it is not clear that the public--and certainly not all of the
public--sees green infrastructure that way. It is associated with increase
storm water management fees, is very visible throughout the city, and may to
be understood or a welcome addition in all neighborhoods. Additionally, it is
associated by some with neighborhood gentrification--so there are significant
equity concerns as well.

This project will use content analysis (a method of systematically collecting
information from texts) to better understand public perceptions of green
infrastructure in DC and Philadelphia--two cities that have developed
green-infrastructure intensive approaches and where  gentrification and green
infrastructure equity concerns are significant. Our goal is to better
understand how green infrastructure is understood by the public, the
benefits, disadvantages, and challenges that are illuminated through
newspaper sources. I hope that this work will help public officials both
better design green infrastructure programs considering perspectives of
residents and improve community outreach and messaging approaches involving
green infrastructure.

Duties: Learn content analysis best practices and gain a background in green
infrastructure through readings and team discussion. Then, participate in the
data collection process by systematically reading through newspaper articles
to assess the way green infrastructure is discussed within these sources.
Participate in quantitative and qualitative data analysis.

Time commitment: 7-9 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 5

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  


Professor: Chris Warshaw

Department: Political Science

Title: Partisanship in American Schools: Does the Partisan Composition of Local School Boards Affect Education?

Description: I am starting a new research project that will examine the
consequences of the partisan and ideological composition of local school
boards. In this project, we will gather information about local school board
elections.  We will also gather information about educational outcomes.  This
will enable us to assess whether the partisan and ideological composition of
local school boards affects educational outcomes, such as student/teacher
ratios, teacher salaries, or student achievement. We will also examine
whether the institutional structure of school boards matters.

Duties: 1) Figuring out basic information on the duties of school board
members and the size of school boards for the 200 largest school districts in
the United States
2) Researching school board elections
3) Researching the availability of educational outcome data
4) Researching prior literature on school board elections

Time commitment: 7-9 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  


Professor: Marcus King

Department: ESIA

Title: Global Climate Change and Water Security

Description: I have a book under peer-review on the topic of how extremist
groups can use water and other natural resources as a weapon during the
conduct of war. I am also writing a book chapter on the role of climate
change and COVID-19 as drivers of instability in Iraq. My geographical area
of research is centered on the Middle East and North Africa. Research methods
include literature and document review, expert interviews, review of social
media posts and ideally some analysis using GIS. The goal is to complete the
revisions of the book based on additional research and begin the other
chapter during the Fall semester.

Duties: The student research assistant will conduct literature reviews and
draft short summaries of pertinent readings, and maintain associated citation
software. The RA will create graphs and figures, perform some very basic data
analysis. Some proofreading will also be required. Depending on interest, the
RA could also write blog posts on the issues of global climate change and
security and support the authors engagement with think-tanks and government
organizations working on these issues.

Time commitment: 7-9 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 1

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  


Professor: Gina Adam

Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering Department

Title: Smart robotics with memristor-based neural network control

Description: Training of artificial intelligence systems is consumes massive
amounts of computing resources which is a challenge for autonomous systems,
like robots and self-driving cars. New neuro-inspired hardware alternatives
are necessary to keep up with the increasing demand in complexity and energy
efficiency. Neuromorphic hardware based on emerging analog memory
technologies, like memristors, show promise for dense energy efficient
systems given their ultra-scalable footprint and better energy/bit
consumption.

In this project, the student(s) will develop a small robot that implements an
inverted pendulum control using a memristor-based neural network. The
student(s) will work using existing software and hardware platforms
previously developed in the group. The goal is to demonstrate training of the
memristor-based neural network and robotic control in simulation and in
experiments. This project is part of an on-going work in collaboration with a
national lab and a company, so the student(s) will be part of a large team
and learn a variety of interdisciplinary skills, from emerging nanodevices
like memristors to machine learning and robotics. Writing and presentation
skills will also be acquired, as the students will be encouraged to present
at conferences and submit journal papers. Students who have prior programming
or robotics experience are strongly encouraged to apply. The number of course
credits is flexible and depends on how many hours the student can dedicate to
the project.

Duties: - Improve the design and implementation of inverted pendulum
balancing robot
- Implement neural network algorithms using memristors models in C++ for
robotic control
- Establish communication between the robot and an FPGA board
- Demonstrate the neural network algorithm for robot control in simulation
and experiment
- Prepare student research papers, presentations and posters for journals or
conferences

Time commitment: 7-9 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  


Professor: Alessandra Fenizia

Department: Economics

Title:  Preventive Care in the Times of COVID

Description: The current pandemic has reshaped our lives in ways we did not anticipate and forced us to change our routines and plans. Most commentators have focused on the devastating effects of the virus and how to tackle the pandemic effectively. Less attention has been devoted how the epidemic has shifted attention and resources away from other realms of medicine. Anecdotal evidence suggests that many patients have skipped their routine checkups and avoided visiting the hospital or their primary physician unless it was truly necessary. What is the value of preventive care? What is the impact of skipping or postponing a routine checkup? How does this translate in short-term savings and long-term costs for the healthcare system?

Duties: review of the literature on preventive care, proof editing preliminary drafts, collecting qualitative and quantitative data

Time commitment: 4-6 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 2

Number of openings: 1

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  


Professor: Harris Mylonas

Department: Political Science

Title: Nationalism

Description: I’m writing a book on Nationalism for Cambridge University Press.

Duties: This project will involve reading articles and books and writing up
memos summarizing their main findings, focusing in particular on the impact
that nationalism has on other phenomena or processes. Also for each reading
we will be focusing how the authors conceptualize, define, and "measure"
nationalism. The RA will also be helping with references and citations.

Time commitment: 4-6 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 2

Number of openings: 3

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  


Professor: Daqing Yang

Department: History & International Affairs

Title: Memory & Reconciliation in Asia Pacific

Description: Memory & Reconciliation in Asia Pacific is a research and policy program established at Sigur Center for Asian Studies at the Elliott School in 2003 by myself and Prof. Mike Mochizuki.  We have hosted lectures,
conferences, and published research findings related to historical disputes and conflict resolutions in the region. Our website (http://www.memoryreconciliation.org) provides regular updates about current events as well as new research on relevant issues. Our project is connected with the soon-to-be-founded International Association for Reconciliation Studies headquartered in Jena, Germany.

Duties: The RA is primarily responsible for collecting relevant information
from English-language sources and updating our website. The RA may be asked
to compile a report on a particular issue, and assist my ongoing research
related to memory and reconciliation. Knowledge of an Asian language is
helpful but not required.

Time commitment: 7-9 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 1

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  


Professor: Naomi Seiler

Department: Health Policy and Management

Title: Ongoing health policy research

Description: We have a great opportunity for a student to work with a team in
the Department of Health Policy and Management. Overall, we focus on legal
and policy aspects of health system changes, examining how they impact
various public health programs and issues.  Currently, our portfolio of
funders includes federal and state agencies, health care foundations,
non-profit patient advocacy groups, and health care coalitions. We work on a
broad range of public health and prevention issues, including HIV, heart
disease and stroke, mental health and substance use disorder services,
prevention and public health funding, and community prevention of asthma.  We
also do a significant amount of work on Medicaid, Medicare and marketplace
coverage, as well as new payment and service delivery models.

Duties: The research assistant would work with the two faculty members and
four senior researchers on a range of health policy research projects.  They
would conduct qualitative and policy research related to the public health
issue areas listed above.  We are all working remotely, with daily checkins.

Time commitment: 10 or more hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 1

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  


Professor: Jameta Barlow

Department: University Writing Program

Title: Womanist Characterization of African American Literature for Applied Impact

Description: In this political moment, where the pandemics of anti-Black
systems of oppression, science deniers and COVID-19, Womanism offers a lens
in which to address this culture in crisis. Defined as “a social change
perspective rooted in Black women’s and other women of color’s everyday
experiences and everyday methods of problem solving in everyday spaces,
extended to the problem of ending all forms of oppression for all people,
restoring the balance between people and the environment/nature and
reconciling human life with the spiritual dimension,” (Marparyan, 2012;
Phillips, 2006) Womanism is a transdisciplinary humanistic perspective,
epistemology and methodology that has been employed throughout the world to
address environmental issues, sexual violence and mental health, among other
social issues. This project will map seminal African American literature onto
the eight modalities characterizing Womanism, in an effort to explore the
utility of a humanistic intervention during this political moment.

There are eight modalities characterizing Womanism: self-care healing and
wellness practices, which are designed to rectify physical, emotional, mental
and spiritual practices; harmonizing and coordinating, or disposition and
activity to employ differential consciousness and move between divergent
logics and conceptual schemes; dialogue and the power of the word, to express
and establish connection and individuality as well as tension and connection;
arbitration and mediation, where conflict is transformed into peace; spiritual
activities, a socio-ecological transformational activity rooted in a
spiritual belief system including religious participation to transmutation
practices; hospitality, the transformative power of welcome that facilitates
powerful encounters; mutual aid and self-help, or everyday collective
grassroots methods garnered from life experience, wisdom, self-education and
democratic knowledge; and motherhood, a social change methodology and social
ecology that recognizes agency and interconnectivity with others.

Womanism is both interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary in its theoretical
framing, ontologies, epistemologies and methodologies. As a community
psychologist and public health scientist, I engage in Womanism modalities in
my work to disrupt cardiometabolic syndrome (e.g., diabetes, heart disease,
stroke, hypertension) among Black communities. Central to this work is my
curriculum of “writehealing” where I use writing to address self-care,
harmoninzing and coordinating and mutual aid and self-help. However, a major
gap in this work is a database of relevant African American literature that
can be utilized for intervention. This project offers a humanistic approach
for applied impact. A database that allows the user to discover African
American literature based on a Womanist modality, emotions and psychological
outcomes bridges multiple disciplinary gaps.

Duties: 1. Data mine, review, organize and characterize African American
literature according to the Womanist modality and health behavior(s)
2. Participate in weekly project meetings
3. Contribute to online database management and manuscript development

Time commitment: 7-9 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  


Professor: Patricia Phalen

Department: SMPA

Title: Hollywood & Politics: One Hundred Years of Connections (this is a working title)

Description: This project is about discovering the myriad connections between
the world of Hollywood and the world of politics.  The result will be a book
length project about these connections and how both sides influence each
other over time.

Duties: The most important requirements for the job are:  an interest in the
worlds of entertainment and politics; strong research skills; and a
willingness to learn.  Duties will include finding and summarizing academic
literature, keeping up with connections by reading current trade and popular
publications, and transcribing interviews.

Time commitment: 7-9 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 1

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  


Professor: Cynthia Core

Department: Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences

Title: Research in bilingual language development in young children

Description: The Bilingual Language Development Lab under the direction of
Cynthia Core investigates how young children learn two languages. Our current
projects include language development in Spanish-English and Korean-English
learning children ages 12-24 months and a survey of pediatric nurses and
speech-language pathologists regarding their views on bilingual language
development. Ongoing projects involve a long-term collaboration on the
largest longitudinal bilingual language development project in the US of
approximately 200 Spanish-English speaking children from the ages of 2 1/2
years to adolescence, focusing on speech, language, and literacy development
in both languages. Goals from these projects include understanding basic
sources of individual variation in bilingualism and how variation in the
language environments creates various bilingual outcomes. We aim to provide
basic information about bilingual development to clinicians and other
professionals (medical and education) working with young bilingual children
and families in order to help identify bilingual children who may be at risk
of language learning or academic difficulty. We regularly present our work at
national and international conferences, typically with student researchers,
and we have published our work in several top language and child development
research journals.

Duties: Research assistants in the Bilingual Language Development Lab will
compile results of surveys, create data spreadsheets, organize data, assist
with data analysis, review research in the area of bilingual language
development and language assessment, and work with a research team to draft
results and research reports, such as presentations and publications.
Spanish-speaking research assistants can also speak with Spanish-speaking
families to collect research data via videoconference interviewing. Research
assistants will work remotely to complete tasks, and will benefit from
regular lab meetings with the Principal Investigator and graduate students in
the Speech-Language Pathology working in the lab. Dr. Core will provide close
individual supervision to develop research skills in data organization, data
analysis, phonetic transcription, language analysis, and basic research
principles. Student research projects may be tailored to individual interests
and abilities, as long as they are within the current scope of the lab, in
collaboration with Dr. Core at the beginning of the research period. Research
assistants who speak fluent, near-native or native Spanish or Korean or
another language (Arabic, Amharic, Mongolian, and others) are preferred.
Knowledge of phonetics or language sample analysis is a plus. Students who
have a background or interest in speech-language pathology, linguistics,
special education, bilingualism, psychology, or language learning should
apply for this position in an exciting, engaging research lab.

Time commitment: 7-9 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  


Professor: Randi Kristensen

Department: University Writing

Title: JAMAL: Adult literacy decolonizing knowledge and activism in 1970s Jamaica 

and/or 2nd project: creating the worthy recipient in humanitarian work -- the Irish Famine

Description: 
JAMAL and adult literacy is a hybrid performance/research paper I was invited
to give at a conference on Decoloniality in the Caribbean at York University
in October 2019. Conference proceedings are being organized, and I could use
research assistance filling in more of the context and impact of JAMAL -- the
Jamaican Adult Literacy program -- from the 1980s to the present. I have some
interviews to do, but there are places in the literature where JAMAL is cited
as a model for other programs, and newspaper clippings that describe the
evolution of the program in the 2000s.

The second project is a quest for references to historical documents, or
perhaps even discovering where those historical documents live, that provide
the discourse of the worthy (or unworthy) recipient of humanitarian aid in
the era of the Irish famine. This work is prologue for a book project that is
underway amplifying local aesthetic critiques of humanitarian solutions for
structural issues in the Caribbean writ large: Jamaica, Haiti, and New
Orleans. By aesthetic critique I mean films, novels, art installations,
parades, and other artistic genres that offer an alternative narrative and
resistance to how need is constructed and met, or not.


Duties: A research assistant on both projects would be conducting literature
searches and reviews, in the first case in literacy studies and Caribbean
sources, and in the second case reading histories of the Irish Famine and the
humanitarian response to it for clues about how the Irish people were
described to potential donors, and also for clues about where those
documents, newspaper ads, letters of appeal, etc. are currently archived.

In either/both cases, a research assistant who could provide 2-3 hours of
research a week, and produce a tagged annotated bibliography of their
findings would be a tremendous assist this semester. They would gain research
skills in areas and source material that are under-researched, and both
projects engage with questions of how social change is or is not produced.

Time commitment: 1-3 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 1

Number of openings: 1

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  


Professor: Sanjay Pandey

Department: Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration

Title: Comparing perspectives on systemic racism in sociology and history with public policy and public administration

Description: Public policy and public administration literature draws from strands of political science and economics the downplay the importance of history and structure on racism.  The goal of the research project is to characterize public policy and public administration scholarship on systemic racism and explore how it can be enriched by incorporating scholarship from sociology and history.

The research project will involve coming up with a literature search strategy, implementing it, refining it for identifying relevant scholarly articles.  The next step is coming up with a strategy for extracting relevant information from the articles using closed and open coding.  Based on these two steps, the student will write a report on how public policy scholarship can better account for systemic racism.

Duties include:
1) Under instructor guidance come up with a work plan and revise it, as
necessary
2) Implement the plan and communicate regularly (once a week or once every
two weeks) with the instructor and act on the feedback
3) Create an annotated bibliography and come up with a scheme for extracting
relevant information
4) Extract relevant information from different disciplinary sources
5) Analyze, review, reflect, and write a brief report
6) Keep clear and extensive documentation of steps in the research process.

Time commitment: 10 or more hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 1

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  


Professor: Maggie Chen

Department: Economics/ESIA

Title: Foreign Powers, Trademark Protection, and Firm Growth in Shanghai's
Concession Era

Description: In this paper, we investigate the influence of IP institutions,
specifically, trademark law on industrial and firm growth by exploiting
unique historical events in the 1870-1945 Republican China and a series of
newly digitized micro-level datasets in Shanghai that provide rare,
first-hand insights into how firms operated and interacted in arguably one of
the most volatile and complex periods of history.

Duties: data entry and construction, literature search, case study, and data
analysis

Time commitment: 7-9 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to[email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  


Professor: Kathryn Kleppinger

Department: French

Title: The Marseille Mosaic: A Transdisciplinary Study of a City at the Crossroads of Cultures

Description: I am currently working on a publication about the French city
Marseille. It is both the second-largest and also the most heavily
immigrant-populated city in France, yet it has escaped many of the
difficulties faced by other French cities. It has neither produced nor been
the target of a homegrown terrorist, and its urban institutions have been
much more welcoming of ethnic and religious differences. I am co-editing a
volume of essays on this topic and also writing my own essay on the current
Marseille rap scene. I am exploring how Marseille-based rappers promote a
different vision of French identity through their music and social media
presence.

Duties: I would use an assistant to help me read the lyrics and social media
postings of prominent Marseille-based rappers. I will provide the names and
albums and would ask the assistant to summarize the songs as well as flag
relevant social media posts and newspaper articles. The main qualification
required for this position is an advanced knowledge of the French language,
as all of the reading would be conducted in French. I put 4-6 hours per week
for my time commitment, but I am happy to adjust up or down depending on the
needs of the RA.

Time commitment: 4-6 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 2

Number of openings: 1

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  


Professor: Douglas Boyce

Department: Music

Title: digital and social media platforming of performance recording archive

Description: As a composer, my 30 years ot creative live have produced a
large archive of scores, recordings, programs, interviews, etc);  I have also
run a nonporofit performing organization for 20 years and so there is
similarly expansive collection of performance recordings both of major works
of the repertoire, and numerous world premieres.  One of my current projects
is both cataloging extant works, and 'platforming' video and audio
recordings.  Depending on the skills of the research assitant, this could
involved audio or video editing, or even updating musical scores.

I have indicated a 4 weekly our minimum with 2 slots, but both factors are
variable – this is a very large collection (and one that continues to
grow), but also some of the needed tasks are quite simple and value could be
gained from even a few hours or assistance a week.  Similarly, I have
indicated a 1 credit option for students, since that seems most likely, but
this could easily becamse a 3-credit independent project cataloging
performance culture in NY in the last quarter decade.

As I have worked with many leading artists, the assitant will also have to
communicate with leading performers, presenters, and recording labels.

Duties:

  • organize and integrate multiple audio, visiual recordings and scores from multiple drives

  • continue the ongoing cotaloging of works and performances into pre-existning system

  • aid in the uploading of some of these materials in to various platforms (youtube, soundcloud, etc)

  • communicate with collaborators, presenters and publishers.

  • if the research assistant has particular skills, this work could include video and audio editing score editing


Time commitment: 4-6 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 1

Number of openings: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to[email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  


Professor: Luis Ballesteros

Department: International Business
Research Project Title: The effects of disasters on entrepreneurship and innovation
Research Project Description:
If engaging in innovative behavior and business creation entails risk
tolerance and experiencing episodes of high uncertainty can alter risk
preferences, then uncertainty shocks may explain the geographical
distribution of innovation and entrepreneurship.

The project's goal will be to evaluate these relationships. The first step
follows up analyses on a decade-long database of inventor-specific patent
filings in the United States. This presents evidence that U.S. counties
exposed to the consequences of Hurricane Katrina experienced increases on the
average likelihood of patent filings, which are not explained by a set of
alternative factors.


We then will use a survey representative of the national population to map
the relationship between disasters, risk aversion, and entrepreneurship.
Research Assistant Duties:
1.      Writing and running statistical models and interpreting results.
2.      Cleaning and coding databases.
3.      Using natural language processing for obtaining data.
4.      Running machine learning algorithms.
5.      Automating tasks via Python.
6.      Producing visual and written reports on findings.
Number of position openings: 2
Weekly time commitment: 7-9 hours
Credit hour option: 3 credits


*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  


Professor: Chris Warshaw

Department: Political Science

Title: The Ideological Positions of Democratic and Republican State Party
Platforms in the United States

Description: In this project, I am working with a team of researchers to code
the ideological positions of Democratic and Republican state parties in all
fifty states over the past 50 years using 1,800 individual party platforms
from 1960-2016.  These platforms include the state parties' positions on
dozens of policy issues, including gay rights, abortion, climate change, gun
controls, and many more.  This project will shed new light on the historical
development of party positions.  It will also speak to debates about
polarization and representation (i.e., the links between public opinion and
political parties).

Duties: The research assistant(s) will read Democratic and Republican state
party platforms to help me code the issue positions of Democratic and
Republican state parties in the United States over the past 50 years. They
will code each state party's position on issues like gun control, abortion,
climate change, taxes, women's rights, and many more. This project will give
research assistant(s) the opportunity to learn more about the development of
the American party system. It also give them the opportunity to learn more
about dozens of policy issues, and the positions of political parties on
these issues.

Time commitment: 7-9 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 4

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  


Professor: Kylie Quave

Department: University Writing Program and Anthropology

Title: Data sharing approaches to reconstructing ancient technology

Description: The objective of the Cuzco Archaeological Ceramics Project is to understand how the Inca state (ca. 1300-1530s CE) impacted local economies in
the heartland of the Inca empire (Cuzco, Peru). This project is a collaboration between Peruvian and North American researchers and specialists. Our focus is on ceramic sherds, which have been excavated in pre-Inca (1000-1400s CE) and Inca archaeological sites in the region of Cuzco. By studying changes in ceramic style and technology over several centuries before and during Inca imperialism, we reconstruct how local peoples interacted with the empire and responded to it, as well as how the Incas used craft economies (specifically ceramics) to change labor landscapes and alter daily lifeways.

In Phase 1, my colleagues and I identified excavated sites from which to sample that would provide a broad cross-section of the Inca heartland in these periods. Ceramic sherds were drawn (to compare forms and uses of ceramic vessels) and photographed. We recorded attributes of artistic style by photographing the sherds themselves, and recorded technological attributes by taking digital microscope photos of the paste (the interior material) of each sherd.  These drawings have been partially re-drawn in digital format and all images have been organized and curated in a private database.

In Phase 2, we will migrate all the drawings, images, and associated metadata to a public repository such as Harvard Dataverse where other researchers and lay persons may have access to our database. From that public database, we will create a survey in which users (both experts in ceramics and others) will sort images and drawings to create categories of ceramics. We will seek IRB approval before deploying this survey and will use the results of the sorting exercise to demonstrate interobserver error among researchers and others.

In Phase 3, for which we are currently applying for funding, we will use archaeometric methods (geochemical provenance studies and image-based granulometry) to differentiate technological traditions among pre-Inca and Inca ceramics. This final phase will take at least three years and will also include annual workshops with researchers from Cusco, in which we will continue to share data, create protocols for future data sharing, and build consensus about how best to continue studying Inca imperialism through ceramic sherds.


Duties: The research assistant will be responsible for research related to digital data management (Phases 1 and 2), data sharing (Phase 2), and some bibliographic research (preparation for Phase 3). Using Adobe Illustrator, the RA will complete digital drawings of ceramics rim shapes and maintain the organization of the files. The RA will also use Harvard Dataverse or a comparable repository to design and build a database of project files that may be publicly shared, with metadata attached to all files. Once the database is composed, the RA will design and construct an online survey that includes images, using an open source platform such as Google Surveys. Finally, the RA will conduct library-based research on granulometry and the use of JMicrovision for analyzing ceramic technologies. They will annotate the bibliographic citations.

The preference is for a candidate with knowledge of coding and JSON who can use the Dataverse API: http://guides.dataverse.org/en/latest/api/native-api.html. The RA should also be able to conduct library-based research.

I am seeking one RA for 7+ hours per week, two RAs for 4-6 hours per week, or three RAs for 1-3 hours per week.

Time commitment: 4-6 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 2

Number of openings: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  


Professor: Harris Mylonas

Department: Political Science

Title: Greek and Cypriot Political Developments

Description: Conduct background research for the report on Greece that I contribute annually to the European Journal of Political Research.

Duties: Summarize events, find reliable sources to cite, edit text. 

Time commitment: 1-3 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 1

Number of openings: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  


Professor: Graciela Kaminsky

Department: Economics

Title: Two Hundred Years of Financial Globalization

Description: This project compares two episodes of financial globalization.
The first episode started with the end of the Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815).
The end of these wars fueled a reduction of public spending and a bonanza in
international lending as interest rates in England and France sharply
declined.  This episode ended with the Great Depression in 1931.  It is at
the onset of the Great Depression that governments around the world erected
barriers to capital mobility in their effort to eliminate volatility in
financial markets.  International capital markets basically disappeared.
The second episode of financial globalization restarted with the collapse of
the Bretton Woods System in the early 1970s.   As exchange rates started to
fluctuate, governments around the world could implement an independent
monetary policy without the need of capital controls.  Controls on capital
mobility were abandoned and international capital flows restarted.
This project examines the characteristics of international capital flow booms
and busts in these two episodes of financial globalization.  Are capital
flows becoming more unstable?  Do all capital flow bonanzas end in financial
crises?  Do Central Banks in the financial center fuel volatility in capital
flows to the periphery?  What type of shocks trigger turmoil in international
capital markets?
The project involves the creation of two databases for the first episode of
financial globalization.  For the first database, students collect
information on international capital flows using data on bonds and shares
issued in the financial centers of that time: London, Paris, Berlin, Hamburg,
Frankfurt, and New York.  For the second database, students collect data on
prices of government bonds in the financial centers and data on a variety of
news using the digital collection of the London Times and the Economist
during the 19th century and early 20th century.



Duties: Students may be involved in the creation of the two databases.  The
data on bonds and shares issued in the financial centers as well as the data
on prices of government bonds is in photos taken in archives.  The data on
economic, political, and financial news is collected from the London Times
(for the years 1820 to 1842) and from the Economist (for the years 1843 to
1931).  Students will work under the supervision of faculty and periodical
meetings will be set to help the students in their work.



Time commitment: 10 or more hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  


Professor: Ahmed Louri


Department: Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Title: High-performance, Power-efficient, and Reliable Computer Architecture
Design

Description: High performance computing architectures and technologies
(HPCAT) lab, led by Prof. Ahmed Louri, is a world-class research laboratory.
HPCAT lab investigates novel parallel computer architectures and technologies
which deliver high reliability, high performance, and energy-efficient
solutions to important application domains and societal needs. The research
has far-reaching impacts on the computing industry and society at large.
Current research projects include: (1) the use of machine learning techniques
for designing energy-efficient, reliable multicore architectures, (2)
scalable accelerator-rich reconfigurable heterogeneous architectures, (3)
emerging interconnect technologies (photonic, wireless, RF, hybrid) for
network-on-chips (NoCs) & embedded systems, (4) future parallel computing
models and architectures including Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs), Deep
Neural Networks (DNNs), near data computing, approximate computing, and (5)
cloud and edge computing.

Duties: A research assistant is expected, on a routine basis, to be able to:
(1)     perform administrative and research tasks under the direction of faculty
member or senior research assistants;
(2)     assist with experiments, simulations, and coding;
(3)     perform literature searches, review content, and prepare written
summaries;
(4)     prepare drafts for articles, reports, or presentations.

Time commitment: 10 or more hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 0

Number of openings: 3

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  


Professor: Jozef Przytycki


Department: Mathematics

Title: Knot Theory, assisting in editing, programming,  and research

Description: Knot Theory is a discipline of modern mathematics, part of
topology (geometria situs). Student(s) will assist me with editing programing and
doing research in Knot Theory.

Duties: Students under my supervision will be involved in tasks as below:

1. Student would assist in preparing/editing research paper for arXiv
submission (and eventual publication). Student has to learn LaTeX and how to
draw figures in xfig or other similar
program.

2. Many invariants of graphs and knots require pattern testing which require
to wrote simple (or not that simple) programs. Also programs are needed to
analyze simple algebraic structures related to knots.

I assume student would assist me 4-6 hours a week (2 credit) but I am
flexible, so more, or less is possible.

Time commitment: 4-6 hours per week (average)

Note: 2 openings!

Credit hour option*: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  


Professor: Alex Pyron

Department: Biological Science

Title: Species Delimitation in Desmognathus Salamanders

Description:
The Dusky Salamanders, genus Desmognathus, are one of the most diverse and
abundant animals in the eastern forests of the United States. They are
classic study organisms for ecology and behavior. Despite their visibility
and imperilment, we know little about their genetic diversity and
evolutionary history. While there are only 21 currently named species, recent
work using DNA sequencing has revealed at least 45 potential species, which
would more than double the size of the group.


Duties: The research assistant will work with me to collect data and build a
computational model to distinguish between cryptic species of Desmognathus
salamander. Classes in ecology/evolution and experience with statistics are a
plus.

Time commitment: 1-3 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 1

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  


Professor: David Mitchell

Department: English

Title: Disposable Humanity (feature-length documentary film)

Description: "Disposable Humanity" consists of three story strands that
create a braid across history and culture in relationship to disabled people
and their treatment in Nazi Germany during World War II and into the present.
The film will: 1) document the Nazi medical mass murder of 300,000+ “mental
patients” in psychiatric institutions (referred to as Aktion T4); 2)
examine the growing efforts in Germany and elsewhere (including the United
States, Poland, Austria, Czech Republic, and Italy) to commemorate and
memorialize the victims; 3) explore the history of our personal family
journeys undertaken as disabled people to visit these memorial sites since
the late 1990s.  Thus, the planned film will interweave history, culture, and
disability experience into its effort to make visible a forgotten and/or
erased aspect of Holocaust history.

Duties: Research assistants will assist with tracking down key historical
documents, photos, film clips, permissions related to the illustration of key
documentary film themes, topics, and interview b-roll materials. Each
assistant will be given a key theme to track down the best illustrative
documents -- for instance, one RA might watch all of the propaganda films
created around the sterilizations and, ultimately, murder of disabled people
institutionalization during World War II, select best clips to illustrate
ideas, and track down appropriate permissions related to the use of desired
materials in the final documentary film.  Another student would transcribe
remaining interview transcripts and analyze the interview discussions with
respect to key themes covered (grass roots preservation of historical T4
locations, selection process, memorialization efforts, reparations advocacy
efforts, etc.). A third RA would research key documents such as photos of
Himmler visiting the first gassing facility at Poznan, Poland, Medical
meldobogen forms for gassing selections in Berlin, biographical victim data
available on websites (for example, gedenkort-T4.com; YadVashem.org),
physician and medical personnel trial transcripts and photos/film, etc. The
objective is to employ students in important archival work that goes into the
crafting of a feature-length film documentary

Number of Openings: 3

Time commitment: 4-6 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  


Professor: Yvonne Captain


Department: RGSLL

Title: " 'African' Surnames in the Americas"

Description: The project concerns research on families with last names that
date from trans-Atlantic slavery and carry on until the present day in both
the United States and in Latin America.  Family Names like Senegal, Congo,
Africano, and Angola are far more common than most people assume.  Through
personal interviews, data collection in various sources, information on the
families is garnered.  A series of questions are communicated, typically in
person, to each of the interviewees in order to see what the Brazilian,
Colombian, and U.S. families have in common as we draw conclusions related to
the African Diaspora.

Duties: The 1st student will input raw data as it already exists into the
database, and if there is time, will help the professor with research that
contributes to further data.  Student will also help maintain contact with
the professor's  co-investigator colleagues in Brazil and Colombia.
The 2nd student will aid in analyzing Excel queries that are already set up
by the professor and that will be further enhanced by student #1.  Some
knowledge of databases beyond beginning status-or the willingness to
learn is best for student #2
While no knowledge of the Spanish or Portuguese languages is necessary, it
does not hurt!
If either student prefers to work on a non-credit basis, we can consult with
the Honors Program to see what the best option is.

Time commitment: 4-6 hours per week (average) or 7-9 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 2 or 3 credits

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  


Professor: Diego Abente Brun


Department: Elliott School of International Affairs

Title: The Foreign of Brazil: From the Discourse to the Facts

Description: This project consists of following up the foreign policy
decisions and positions of the Bolsanaro government and explore the
congruence/incongruence between words and deeds. Especial emphasis will be
paid to relations with Argentina. It implies also to compare and contrast his
government's foreign policy with that of previous governments and includes
the analysis of the role of key institutions, chiefly Itamaraty, but also
private actors such as business associations, the Congress, civil society
organizations and the media.


Duties: 1. To identify key issue-areas.( In close consultation with the
Instructor)
2.  To collect data and review the literature. (Portuguese and Spanish
reading language proficiency required)
3. To trace and underline the difference and similarities with previous
official positions.
4. To explore the likely course of events in the future.
5. To conclude with a summary of the key findings, the risks and
opportunities they offer, and policy recommendations for other foreign actors
such as the United States, Europe,  and regional actores.
6. The project will be discussed with the instructor and may be adjusted
based on the student's interests.

Time commitment: 4-6 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  


Professor: Melissa Keeley

Department: Geography

Title: Sustainability and Green Infrastructure in Shrinking Cities (those facing economic and population decline)

Description: This summer, I would like to work with a small virtual research team to explore how cities facing economic and population decline are using or can use green infrastructure (which I think of as open space, parks, urban agriculture, trees, wetland systems etc.) in their pursuit of sustainability and, for instance, to stabilize vacant land. Students will help with an annotated bibliography/ background research on this topic, which will examine cities globally. Students may also choose a city to focus on--identifying grey (governmental) and other literature on this topic. At this point, I know that several cities in Japan, Portugal, Germany and many post-Soviet states are on my list of interest, so students with working knowledge of these languages could also utilize these language skills. Students would work virtually and largely independently through the summer, and our research group will meet virtually once or twice a week. I will ask students to dedicate 10-15 hours a week to this project, though students determine their own work schedule. (Students can certainly take some weeks off for vacation).

Research Assistant Duties: Conduct an annotated bibliography/ background research on specific topics. Learn advanced literature search techniques. Develop key skills in organizing group research projects.

Number of openings: 10

Average weekly time commitment: 10+ hours

Credit hour option*: 3 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: [email protected]

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.
 


Professor: Melissa Keeley

Department: Geography

Title: Evaluating Bioswales in DC: How do they contribute to stormwater management, climate change adaptation, and community wellbeing?

Description: This summer, I am looking for student help in developing a long-term research project that will follow the environmental performance and public of rain gardens (bioswales) across each of DC’s eight Wards. Bioswales are a new, naturalistic technology that many hope will help the city manage stormwater, prepare for climate change and even improve air quality in the city. This study is meant to understand how these technologies actually function in the urban landscape. For instance: How well do they function over time? Are they appropriately maintained or do they become an eyesore? Are they understood and perceived as an amenity by the community? Are they perceived as part of a gentrification trend?

Research Assistant Duties: I would like to find a team of 2-3 students, working in DC over the summer, who will need to coordinate their schedules to work on this project. Students will use map and data from the city to identify the locations of bioswales across the city. This data is imperfect. Students will travel in a team walking, using public transportation, or personal bikes or cars to visit each bioswale, confirm its location and accessibility, and collect basic data. Students will develop skills in teamwork, organization, and time management. Students will need to manage large quantities of data and shared documents. (Mapping skills are great, but not necessary). Students will use this data to help determine the bioswales that will be included in the long term study and--time permitting--may also collect data for the first year.

Number of openings: 3

Average weekly time commitment: 10+ hours

Credit hour option*: 3 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: [email protected]

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.