Current Openings

Research Opportunities for Honors Students

Option to Receive Academic Credit

If offered, students have the option to receive academic credit for a research assistantship by submitting an Honors Contract by the designated academic term deadline. For academic credit in Spring 2022, the deadline to submit an Honors contract is Friday, January 28th by 5pm.

Click here for more information and FAQs

 

Open Positions

Please Note: Positions are sorted by faculty home department. You do not need to have a major or minor in their department or school to apply unless specified otherwise in position description. 

 

American Studies

 

Biological Sciences

 

Dance/Corcoran School
Economics
Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering
English
The Gender Equality Initiative in International Affairs
Geography
Geological Sciences
Graduate School of Political Management 
Health Policy and Management 
History
Institute for International Science and Technology Policy
Interior Architecture
International Affairs
International Business
Mathematics
Music
Political Management 
Political Science
Prevention & Community Health
Psychological and Brain Sciences
Romance, German, and Slavic Languages & Literatures
School of Media and Public Affairs
School of Nursing
Tratchenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration
University Writing Program

 

RA Position Descriptions

Professor: Andrew Thompson

Title: Media coverage of racial demographic change and American political parties

Description: This project will investigate how American mass media outlets have covered the changing racial demographics of the US. It will give particular attention to how Democratic and Republican parties have been projected to alter their platforms in reaction to these changes. This project starts with the Reagan administration in 1980 leading up to the present day.  The methods it will utilize are content analyses, paying close attention to themes that emerge in media coverage over time. The ultimate goal of this project is to determine how media frames about the politics of racial demographic change have evolved over time.

Research Assistant Duties: Research assistants will carefully examine databases of media coverage, identifying relevant articles in a systematic fashion, then will provide a content analysis of the coverage.

Number of openings: 2

Average weekly time commitment: 3-5 hours

Credit hour option*: 4 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: Professor Thompson ([email protected])

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.


Professor:  Maida Withers
Department: Corcoran School - Dance  Program

Title:  Engaging social media platforms for LEGACY - Dance Construction Company performed exhibition 

Description:  I am working with a team of multimedia artists to create and present LEGACY, a performed installation and history exhibition celebrating the life and work of Maida Withers and the Dance Construction Company, Washington, DC.  LEGACY explores how data, image and concepts from the past, creates new contextual meaning when the past becomes the future, a journey into the mind of a dance artist emboldened by technology. The exhibition is made possible by the collection of 50 years of  digital archives of photographs, films, original electronic music, live poetry, narratives, and interviews related to dance works for stage, site, and film.  All data is available online in the archives and/or on vimeo.  The research assist will be part of the LEGACY production. The exhibition is planned for Oct/Nov 2022 in the Corcoran Galleries in the GW Flagg Building.  The current research assistant position is for Spring 2022.

Duties: The assistantship involves primarily working with public awareness through social media using digital dance archives . The assistant would continue a project begun in Fall 2021.  Project: a dance work is selected from the archive; a visual is designed for posting every week or 10 days on social media; the design includes a brief narrative, photo(s), and video of a stage, site, or film work – all resources available in the archives and on vimeo.  The Dance Company social media platforms are managed and developed by the research assistant in conjunction with myself and Robin Bell, noted projection artist and principal collaborator for the exhibition. Depending on the skills of the assistant, this could involve supervised video editing for projects related to social media and the exhibition. The assistantship is designed for one or  two students and for a 1 or 3 credit option with commitment of a minimum 4 to 6 hours weekly.

Time Commitment: 4 to 6 hours per week

Credit Option*: 1 to 3

Number of Openings:  2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: Maida Withers, Choreographer/Filmmaker/Scholar ([email protected] and [email protected]) ,

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.


Professor: Casey Burgat

Department: Graduate School of Political Management, Legislative Affairs

Research Title: Politics Book Manuscript Research

Description: I am currently beginning a book manuscript on the many challenges and potential solutions to our national politics. I will rely heavily on academic research, authoritative sources, first hand accounts, and interviews to provide context and recommendations.

Research Assistant Duties: The ideal RA will help synthesize findings and arguments across a variety of politically-related topics, including but not limited to: books/journals, government sources (i.e., Congressional Record and committee reports), and transcription of interviews conducted by the author.

Number of openings: 1

Average weekly time commitment: 3-5 hours

Credit hour option*: 2 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: Professor Burgat ([email protected])

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.



Professor: Cynthia McClintock

Department: Political Science

Research Title: Voter Satisfaction under Plurality, Runoff, and Ranked-Choice Voting: The Impact of Come-from-Behind Victories

Description: This research is one component of a larger project on voter satisfaction under different majoritarian electoral rules—namely, ranked-choice voting, runoff, and plurality (first past-the-post) world-wide. In this study, a GWU Ph.D. candidate, Joseph Cerrone, and I measure voter satisfaction under the three rules in part by whether or not the rule is repealed. For nations, we were able to research easily whether or not a rule was repealed and why it was repealed; but, for cities in the U.S., information about repeals was often very limited. Although we determined that, of the 50 largest U.S. cities, only 8 retain plurality and 38 use runoff, information about the reasons for the repeal of plurality takes considerable time to find. Information on this issue would be very helpful for our project.

Research Assistant Duties: In general, the responsibility is to secure information about when and why electoral rules for the mayoralty in the largest U.S. cities have been repealed. The first task would be to identify expert consensus about which 50 U.S. cities are the largest. The second task would be to identify the electoral rule(s) used for mayoralty elections (both primary and general elections) in these cities and any changes in these rules since approximately 1950. The third task would be to explore the reasons for any changes. Most of the research would be done through a review of each city's newspapers.

Number of openings: 1

Average weekly time commitment: 5-7 hours

Credit hour option*: 3 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: Professor McClintock ([email protected])

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.


Professor: Melissa Batchelor

Department: School of Nursing

Research Title: AARP/ Age-Friendly Social Innovation Challenge  

**Time Sensitive Request**

Description: This project is with the GW Center for Aging, Health and Humanities (CAHH) and is funded through a 2021 AARP Community Challenge Grant. The CAHH will host the inaugural Age-Friendly Social Innovation Challenge on October 27th 9am-4pm EST with the GW Nashman Center, Georgetown University and the 5 Age-Friendly Cities of Alexandria, Arlington, DC, Hyattsville, and Montgomery County .

Research Assistant Duties: We will be obtaining some metrics related to program evaluation with the intent of developing a manuscript for this event to serve as a national model for AARP. We need Student Facilitators for the October 27th event (Training will be October 21st 2-4pm EST) and to participate in analyzing the program evaluations/ developing the manuscript, and potentially participating in developing the podcast/ social media dissemination plan (if interested) openings  Open to up to 5 students, but they can just serve as facilitators and don't have to do anything related to writing it up. Just offering the intergenerational opportunity to participate in this regional event.

Number of openings: 5

Average weekly time commitment: 1-3 hours

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: Professor Batchelor ([email protected])
 


Professor: Gwen Young

Department: GEIA

Research Title: Global Women's Leadership Index

Description: The GEIA Global Women's Leadership Index has been updated as of 2019 but needs insights into latest trends in leadership in public office. This includes analyzing the measurement of women's power in public office; updating the data of women leading countries and analyzing the pathways to key posts in judicial, civil service and elected office.

Research Assistant Duties: The research assistant will analyze data and write short 1000 word pieces. The assistant will also help verify data sources and analyze key findings in light of other indexes.

Number of openings: 1

Average weekly time commitment: 5-7 hours

Credit hour option*: 0 - No credit option

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: Professor Young ([email protected])

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.


Professor: Andrew Thompson

Department: Political Science

Research Title: The Big Flip: How Racial Demographic Change is Changing American Politics

Description: The U.S. is in midst of a sizable shift to its racial demographics. That is, dynamics of size of groups are changing rapidly. By midcentury, minority and majority groups are flipping. Whites will become a minority and racial minorities will become the majority group as a whole.

These coming changes have elicited reactions of the major American political parties. Republican and Democrat elites have spent much time thinking through how to pivot the party’s messaging and campaigning in order to appeal to a diversifying America. Both parties must contend with how they adjust their strategies in the coming years to accommodate these inevitable changes, or else risk ceding ground to the other party.

In this project, I focus on how all Americans are reacting to these demographic changes, and specifically how their attitudes toward fellow Americans and American democracy are being affected by these changes. On a theoretical level, this project involves the study of racial attitudes among Americans of color and white Americans, Americans’ views of democracy and political parties. Concerning methods, this project will involve the use of experiments and surveys, and in some instances interviews and fieldwork in local communities that have experienced racial demographic changes. The ultimate goal of this project is to investigate how racial demographic change in the U.S. is affecting American democracy.

Research Assistant Duties: Responsibilities and duties will include: literature reviews of recent political science research; assistance in constructing and analyzing experiments and surveys; and fieldwork in local communities

Number of openings: 4

Average weekly time commitment: 5-7 hours

Credit hour option*: 3 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: Professor Thompson ([email protected])

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.


Professor: Nicholas Vonortas

Department: Economics (CCAS) & Institute for International Science and Technology Policy (ESIA)

Research Title: Develop short intensive training course on tech-intensive entrepreneurship

Description: Produce background material and business cases to support a short intensive MBA training course on technology-intensive entrepreneurship. The course will consist of fifteen hours of class contact time. Intended to be a hands-on experience covering the entrepreneur -- how to build and manage a tech start-up -- and that of the policy decision maker -- how to set up an appropriate local ecosystem to spawn such start-ups. The course will be delivered to MBA candidates mid-Spring 2022 semester.

Research Assistant Duties: The RA will review the literature on tech entrepreneurship and, less so, on innovation ecosystems. S/he will also search for business cases to support the issues discussed during the lectures. There will probably be a need to interview a few practitioners such as the GW's entrepreneurship program. Ideally, the RA will also help in preparing the long power point presentation. This activity does not require quantitative analytical skills. However, the RA should be able to review papers that include elements of such analysis to some extent. The core skills for the RA is critical thinking, ability to process and synthesize information, and interest in the subject matter.

Number of openings: 1

Average weekly time commitment: 3-5 hours

Credit hour option*: 2 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: Professor Vonortas ([email protected])

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.
 


Professor: Marie Price

Department: Geography

Research Title: Reception of Immigrants and Refugees at the US/Mexico Border

Description: Professors Marie Price and Elizabeth Chacko, both in the Department of Geography, are conducting research on how cities and towns across the US receive and integrate immigrants.  In particular, we are focusing on several border towns in CA, AZ and TX.  Using in-depth interviews, institutional data, and policy analysis of the Migration Protection Protocols (MPP) and Title 42 we are investigating how local governments and civil society are responding to arrivals, especially during Covid.

Research Assistant Duties:

  • Content Analysis of Transcribed Interviews
  • Updates on Govt Policy, especially MPP
  • Review of Institutional Data from Customs and Border Patrol
  • Assist with additional interviews


Number of openings: 1

Average weekly time commitment: 3-5 hours

Credit hour option*: 2 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: Professor Price ([email protected])

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.


Professor: Imani Cheers

Department: SMPA

Research Title: "It Takes a Village: The Basics of Boyhood and Methods for Manhood"

Description: “It Takes A Village: Basics of Boyhood and Messages for Manhood” is an interdisciplinary qualitative multimedia research project that examines the passionate and purposeful images of Black men seen in mainstream social media platforms, Instagram, Tik Tok and YouTube. This project is specifically interested in examining how social media impacts the public and mental health of both content creators and the broader Black community. Using the qualitative research methodology and theoretical framework, photovoice, “It Takes A Village” is titled after the African proverb that acknowledges the importance of family and community in raising and rearing children.

At the core of “It Takes A Village” is a commitment to providing the broader public, mainstream journalists and policymakers an understanding of digital media’s influence on public dialogue and opinion surrounding the holistic representation of Black men as boys, men, friends, fathers and partners.


Research Assistant Duties: We are looking for a detailed orientated student interested in data analysis and social media content creation to assist with a project with the Institute for Data, Democracy and Politics. Students would be responsible for conducting research about Black masculinity, writing articles and managing social media accounts.

Number of openings: 2

Average weekly time commitment: 5-7 hours

Credit hour option*: 3 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: Professor Cheers ([email protected])

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.
 


Professor: Leah Brooks

Department: Trachtenberg School

Research Title: Democratic Governance and Citizen Participation: A Textual Analysis

Description: Since at least de Tocqueville, social thinkers have argued that citizen participation improves democratic governance.  In our project, we ask whether, over the last century, the federal government has increased opportunity for public participation. We define participation to include pre-policy behavior such as voting, behavior near the policy decision such as lobbying, and ex-post behavior including litigation.  We analyze the amount of participation using the text of all statutes passed in the United States since 1920. We use text analysis tools to measure the extent to which the government requires the executive branch to allow or encourage participation. We then evaluate whether this measure of participation correlates to indicia of realized participation including voting and litigation.

Research Assistant Duties:

Duties

  • Help us software to program the conversion of PDF files into a corpus of machine-readable text to be used for further analysis
  • Skills: experience with Python, careful reading and analytical skills
  • Preferred skills: history with natural language processing techniques, PDF parsing software


Skills you may gain

  • How to approach a research question
  • How to digitize large documents into an analyzable corpus
  • How to work in a high performance computing environment
  • Understand how federal statutes are constructed


Number of openings: 1

Average weekly time commitment: 5-7 hours

Credit hour option*: 3 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: Professor Brooks ([email protected])

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.


Professor: Marcus King

Department: Elliott School IAFF

Research Title: Water and Climate Change Security Research

Description: The book The Water Weapon: Water Stress and Islamic Extremism in the Middle East and Africa has been peer reviewed and it is under revision. There is a separate book chapter now under preparation on climate change and COVID's impact on security in Iraq. The goal is assist the author in completing these tasks.

Research Assistant Duties:

  • Use library and internet sources to gather information from academic and policy literature to respond to author’s requests for specific questions
  • Identify sources to build literature review
  • Provide summaries of relevant documents
  • Learn and maintain Zotero research citation software
  • Collect and summarize sources in Zotero


Number of openings: 1

Average weekly time commitment: 5-7 hours

Credit hour option*: 3 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: Professor King ([email protected])

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.


Professor: Maria Frawley

Department: English

Research Title: Keywords of Jane Austen

Description: I am finishing a book proposal related to "keywords" that recur throughout Jane Austen's fiction. The research for this project involves utilizing databases that provide access to Austen's fiction and letters as well as the fiction of her time period (late 18th c. / early 19th c.). It includes drafting sample entries for words identified as "keyword" (e.g., "felicity," "disposition," "esteem"), entries that explore the word's resonance in her fiction, meaning in her time period, and relevance to our own time period. I am also working on an essay on Austen and serendipity that involves research on the scholarship of temporality and narrative. I will craft the research experience according to a student's interest and the kinds of research experiences that he or she would consider most valuable. I am willing to work with a student for no credit or 1 to 3 credit options as specified by UHP standards.

Research Assistant Duties: The research assistant would work with me to identify the keywords selected for research. Research will involve searching databases to identify valuable instances of Austen's usage; searching online dictionaries, such as Johnson's Dictionary, to ascertain use in Austen's time period; and drafting entries that explore the insights to be gleaned from an awareness of Austen's frequent recourse to a particular term. The essay project described above would involve researching via JStor and ProjectMuse as well as old-fashioned library research the scholarship of temporality and narrative generally and more specifically related to Austen's writing and writing up abstracts of this scholarship to help guide the project.

Number of openings: 1

Average weekly time commitment: 3-5 hours

Credit hour option*: 2 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: Professor Frawley ([email protected])

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.


Professor: Nicholas Anderson

Department: Elliott School of International Affairs

Research Title: The Coercive Influence of Diplomatic Relations

Description: The United States has either severed or refused to form diplomatic relations with a number of countries for political reasons, including Iran, North Korea, and Cuba. Is this good policy? How well does it work? This is a new project that will examine whether diplomatic relations are a useful tool of coercion. They key question is whether the explicitly-stated goals of a country deciding to sever, or refusing to form, diplomatic relations are typically met before they are (re)established. To address this question, the project will examine U.S. diplomatic relations from 1785 to the present, focusing on all instances in which the U.S. downgraded or severed diplomatic relations in peacetime.

Research Assistant Duties:

  • Reading through and collecting information from historical diplomatic documents in online archives
  • Reading through and collecting information from secondary sources, such as history books and articles
  • Creating and updating a data set of U.S. diplomatic relations with the rest of the world since 1785


Number of openings: 1

Average weekly time commitment: 5-7 hours

Credit hour option*: 3 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: Professor Anderson ([email protected])

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.
 


Professor: Sharon Wolchik

Department: PSC/ESIA

Research Title: Women Under Communism

Description: I am revising a MS on women's roles and status in Central Europe, with particular focus on the Czech and Slovak Republics, during communism. I will need help updating tables and finding recent works on the subject.  There is no need for any particular language skills.  Applicant should be adept at searching data bases for scholarly articles published here and abroad, and preparing abstracts if none are provided ion the sources found.

Research Assistant Duties:

  1. find data to update tables
  2. find new materials on the subject
  3. prepare abstracts of materials


Number of openings: 1

Average weekly time commitment: 3-5 hours

Credit hour option*: 2 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: Professor Wolchik ([email protected])

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.
 


Professor: Alexa Alice Joubin

Department: English

Research Title: Cinematic Allusions to Shakespeare

Description: Shakespeare’s plays and motifs have been cited and appropriated in fragmentary forms on screen since motion pictures were invented in 1893. Allusions to Shakespeare haunt our contemporary culture in a myriad of ways, whether through brief references or sustained intertextual engagements. These allusions are sometimes disconnected from the Shakespearean contexts. In Tom Hooper’s biopic The King’s Speech (2010), Hamlet’s “to be or not to be” speech is recited in key scenes, suggesting that reciting Shakespeare might just cure stuttering. Lionel Logue (Geoffrey Rush), a speech therapist for King George VI, also uses Caliban’s speech in an educational game with his children. In a film about a stuttering monarch learning to master the radio to speak to his subjects, the “voices in the air” that Caliban longs to hear become ironic. Both the king, who is struggling with speech disorders and is robbed of a voice, and his therapist, a subject from the Commonwealth who is more eloquent but id dismissed by the royal family. Neither The Raven or The King’s Speech are Shakespeare films, but they evoke a range of themes and values associated with Shakespeare.

This book examines "tattered" and fragmentary allusions to Shakespeare. The study of “Shakespeare in tatters” and in fragmented citations differs from the study of adaptations of full Shakespearean plays. Even passing references to Shakespeare can have the power to shift the meanings and readings of a work.

What is the effect of such allusions, whether fleeting references or free appropriations? Furthermore, what are the reception dynamics at play here among “knowing audiences” and amateurs? The meanings of tattered allusions emerge from the oscillation between hypotexts (earlier texts that inspire subsequent works) and hypertexts (texts with embedded allusions that one may or may not pursue).

Research Assistant Duties:

  • Assist in ensuring the manuscript's compliance with specific citation style (such as the MLA or Chicago Style). Details and templates will be provided.
  • Receive substantive research related assignments, such as researching reviews of films
  • Collect and download the reviews, preparing the index to the book, and collecting publications on a specific topic.
  • Assist in editing the manuscript and checking pageproofs before publication.


Number of openings: 1

Average weekly time commitment: 3-5 hours

Credit hour option*: 2 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: Professor Joubin ([email protected])

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.


Professor: Erin Speck

Department: Interior Architecture

Research Title: Lighting Control: A Module for Teaching, II

Description: I am developing a module for Lighting Controls that builds upon a previous module. Full access will be given to all parts of the previous module as a foundation. The final teaching module will include: a lecture, lighting control information for the educator, a powerpoint, minimum one quiz, and minimum one assignment. I am open to the number of hours per week, if a student would like more hours I can certainly provide that opportunity.


Research Assistant Duties:

  • Definition of lighting control terms: Internet of Things (IoT), integrated controls, circadian monitoring, etc.
  • Developing a resource of Lighting Control manufacturers and web sources for educator use is a part of this project, spreadsheet format.
  • Sourcing images for use on slides, with citing. 
  • Integrating lecture content to images on .ppt slides


Number of openings: 1

Average weekly time commitment: 3-5 hours

Credit hour option*: 2 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: Professor speck ([email protected])

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.


Professor: Remi Jedwab

Department: Economics and International Affairs

Research Title: Estimating the Economic Effects of Natural Disasters and Conflict in West Africa

Description: The two research projects described below are academic studies that are conducted to support the policy activities of the Africa department of the World Bank. The first research project is on the economic effects of the drying and shrinkage of Lake Chad, historically one of the largest lakes in the world, and climate change more generally.  We study the long-term effects of this natural disaster in Cameroon, Chad, Niger and Nigeria. The second research project is on the economic effects of the rise and expansion of Boko Haram, one of the largest terrorist organizations in the world, and conflict more generally.  We study the effects of this conflict in Cameroon, Chad, Niger and Nigeria.

Research Assistant Duties: I need help with creating some data that we will use for our quantitative analyses. I also need help analyzing historical sources to improve our understanding of the studied phenomena. I selected 3-5 hours below. It may be 10 hours one week and 0 hour the next week. I'd like someone who could start right away.

Number of openings: 1

Average weekly time commitment: 3-5 hours

Credit hour option*: 2 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: Professor Jedwab ([email protected])

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.


Professor: Mona Zaghloul

Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering

Research Title: Design and fabrication and Measuring Nano sensors for Biomedical Applications

Description: Our modern lives rely on sensors to allow society to run smoothly. Sensors are now everywhere, in the road detect cars at traffic lights and adjust the flow through intersections accordingly. Sensors at shopping malls detect your presence and open doors to allow you to enter. Sensors measure the water level in your washing machine and ensure it doesn’t overflow.

Nano sensors are platforms with a characteristic dimension - nanometer in scale, and work in much the same way as a sensor; they detect either minute particles or miniscule quantities of something. Nano sensors are chemical or mechanical sensors that can be used to detect the presence of chemical species and nanoparticles, or monitor physical parameters such as temperature, on the nanoscale. Nano sensors can be chemical sensors or mechanical sensors. They are used in many applications such as accelerometers devices for airbag in cars, or to study    various chemicals in gases for pollution monitoring, or to monitor plant signaling and metabolism to understand plant biology.

Our research group develop varieties of Nano Sensors for biomedical application such as medical diagnosis purposes either detecting cancer cells in human tissue, or detect covid virus in human samples, or to detect effect of drug delivery to the brain to study neurotransmitter in the brain. Our work includes design and simulate the Nano sensors and fabricate the Nano sensors at GWU clean room and measure the Nano sensors response in our lab using several equipment.

We work in collaboration with GW medical school, National laboratories, and with list of collaborators in other universities.

Student is expected to understand how the GWU- Nano sensors developed are operating. and understand the technique to setup the Nano sensor experiments and measure the data. The student may have to spend some time in government laboratory to measure and characterize the Nano sensor and using their equipment. The student would work closely with GWU PhD students working on this topic and with government scientists. The student would visit GWU clean room to learn how the sensors were fabricated and be familiar with the operations and equipment of the clean room.

Student will learn scientific writing skills and will be encouraged to write and present conference papers and journal papers. The number of course credit is flexible and depends on how many hours the student can dedicate to the project.

Research Assistant Duties: Support the research on Nano sensors and support collecting and analyzing the data.

-Work closely with GWU PhD students associated with the Zaghloul group and with our collaborators to measure and characterize the developed Nano Sensors and share the data with our group

-Prepare Student research paper for possible conference presentation or for journal publications. 

Estimated Time Committment: 7-10 hr./wk.

Credit Hour option*: 3 credits

Submit Cover letter and Resume: to [email protected]

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.


Professor: Melani McAlister

Department: American Studies

Research Title: GWU Covid and Culture

Description: We are doing oral histories with GW alumni, staff, and faculty (also some students) about their experience of Covid. The project has been ongoing for a year, but we need new members for a small team of undergraduate oral historians who will do the interviews. The interviews (also donations of photographs or other documents) will be housed at the university archives. Our webpage is: https://gwucovidproject.com/

Research Assistant Duties: Students will be trained in doing oral histories and will have a script. They will be asked to help in doing outreach, as well as interviewing people who have volunteered. Student will be trained in using captioning software, since all interviews must be captioned. Interviews are usually about 45 minutes. This is an exciting opportunity to gain experience in public history and oral history. Students may do the project for 1-3 credits, depending on their time commitment.

Number of openings: 3

Average weekly time commitment: 5-7 hours

Credit hour option*: 1, 2, or 3 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: Professor McAlister ([email protected])

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.


Professor: W. Douglas Evans

Department: Public Health, Prevention and Community Health

Research Title: Digital Media for Cancer Control: Randomized Controlled Trial and Dose Response Effects

Description: There is little published data on exposure to and evaluations of large-scale, online tobacco control campaigns. The project addresses this gap. Under two specific aims, we will identify the independent effects of varying levels of digital message exposure to promote anti-tobacco attitudes, beliefs, or behaviors among youth and young adults, first through a randomized experiment online, and second through a field-based evaluation. These studies will advance the science of digital health and have wide application to future campaigns.

Research Assistant Duties: Research assistants will be expected to work with faculty and team members at GW, NYU, Truth Initiative*, and engage in the following research activities:
- Work on literature review
- Assist with survey development and data collection
- Attend meetings
- Possibly assist with data analysis and writing manuscripts for papers

* Truth Initiative is America’s largest nonprofit public health organization committed to making tobacco use and nicotine addiction a thing in the past.

This is a great opportunity for those who are interested in public health research and disease prevention through digital media that can expand your experience and career.

Number of openings: 2

Average weekly time commitment: 3-5 hours

Credit hour option*: 2 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: Professor Evans ([email protected])

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.


Professor: Ronald Spector

Department: History

Research Title: [Book] "In Every Clime and Place: U.S. Marines and the
American Century 1899-1953"

Description: Recent events in Afghanistan have illustrated the difficulties encountered when the U.S. and its armed forces attempt to modernise and reshape a foreign socirty to confirm to American ideas of modernity and good government.

During the first half of the 20th century Marines carried out extensive stays, often indistinquishable from occupations, in China, Cuba, the Dominican Republic,  Japan, Haiti,  Korea, Nicaraugua and  the Philippines.

The purpose of these lengthy deployments was most often to "establish  law and order, a viable economy, and a elrcted government resembling the American model. Almost all failed miserably in the latter two tasks.

The great majority of Marines assigned to these missions came from communities where most of their family and neighbors had never traveled beyond a hundred miles of their home.  Few spoke a foreign language.The people of the distant countries they occupied had only a vague understanding of why they had been "invaded" by these strange soldiers, often with the aquiessence of their local rulers.

This book examines the perceptions, attiudes and interactions between the occupiers  and the occupied during the the years that marked the high point of what publisher Henry Luce proclaimed "the American century."

Research Assistant Duties: Because I am presently immunocompromised, the researcher will have an unusually wide-ranging opportunity to conduct research in original documents at the National Archives and the library of Congress just as professional historians do.The research assistant need spend only three to six hours on research but they should be at least two to three hours at a time. Reading knowledge of Spanish or Mandarin is helpful but not required.

Number of openings: 1

Average weekly time commitment: 4-6 hours

Credit hour option*: 2 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: [email protected]

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.


Professor: Joel Lewis

Department: Mathematics

Research Title: Enumeration of nondegenerate hypermatrices over finite fields

Description: The combinatorial field of rook theory is concerned with the following situation: given a subset B of the n-times-n square grid (a board), what can one say about the number of ways to place k rooks on B so that no two of them attack each other?  A particular case of interest is k = n, when there is a rook in every row and column (so that the rook placement is essentially a permutation matrix).

One area of my research has been in linear-algebraic analogues of this problem: given a board B and a finite field F, what can one say about the number of n-times-n matrices of rank k with the property that all of their nonzero entries belong to B?  A particular case of interest is k = n, when one counts invertible matrices.  Perhaps surprisingly, being able to answer this second question also allows one to answer the first question.

A higher-dimensional analogue of a matrix is called a hypermatrix.  In the paper [Colin Aitken, Non-degenerate 2 × k × (k + 1) hypermatrices, Linear and Multilinear Algebra 67:4 (2019)], Aitken showed that non-degenerate 2 × n × (n + 1) hypermatrices have a nice property, analogous to the fact that every invertible matrix can be row-reduced to the identity matrix, and he enumerated non-degenerate 2 × n × (n + 1) hypermatrices with entries in a finite field.  The goal of this project will be to study a rook theory version of Aitken's work, enumerating non-degenerate 2 × n × (n + 1) hypermatrices over a finite field when certain entries are required to be 0.

Research Assistant Duties: In the initial stage of the project, research assistant(s) will read and discuss Aitken's work, as well as earlier work on q-analogues of rook theory.  Subsequently, research assistant(s) will conduct research, working independently to solve open problems.  I expect weekly research meetings of 1-2 hours initially, decreasing in intensity as the
project progresses.  The final goal is to produce a research paper suitable for submission to a journal of undergraduate mathematics research. Successful completion is likely to require at least one calendar year; inquiries are not a commitment.

Solid knowledge of linear algebra (as in Math 2185 or Math 3125) and proof-writing (as in Math 2971W) are a must, as is at least passing familiarity with finite fields.  Some knowledge of abstract algebra (as in Math 4121) is a plus but not required.

Number of openings: 2

Average weekly time commitment: 4-6 hours

Credit hour option*: 2 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: [email protected]

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.


Professor: Carla Berg

Department: Prevention & Community Health

Research Title: Novel tobacco product marketing and regulation

Description: Our lab studies the advertising and marketing of alternative tobacco products, such as vaping products (e.g., JUUL), heated tobacco products (e.g., IQOS), nicotine pouches, and other various products, as well as marijuana. We examining marketing of these products, regulatory compliance by the industry and by retailers, and how consumers perceive and use these products - in the US and more globally.

Research Assistant Duties: Students working in this lab will conduct online tobacco (and marijuana) product advertising and regulatory compliance, conduct phone-based semi-structured interviews of adults in the US regarding their tobacco product use, analyze data from existing survey data and industry advertising data, contribute to manuscript and grant development, and contribute to various other tasks within the lab.

Number of openings: 2

Average weekly time commitment: 7-9 hours

Credit hour option*: 3 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: [email protected]

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.


Professor: Michael Cornfield

Department: Political Management

Research Title: How Party Debates Frame National Issues

Description: The researcher would assist me as I write chapters of a book on the civic value of campaign speeches and debates. Specifically, the researcher would help provide context for transcripts of the 24 presidential debates held in 2015-2016 and the 14 in 2019-2020. My main hypothesis is that as candidates answer questions and engage each other in colloquies they
provide viewers with a sense of priorities and possibilities regarding national government action on the issues of the day. What is deemed realistic and what is not? That is what we can learn from debates.

The researcher will examine a variety of secondary sources on such issues as immigration, the economy, violence, climate change, and abortion to help me test hypotheses and uncover nuances. For example, I contend that on the economy Democrats are mainly Keynesian liberals and Republicans Keynesian conservatives: they want to stimulate the economy through deficit spending but on different government programs; Rand Paul's libertarianism and Bernie Sanders's democratic socialism were outlier positions.,

The work should be of interest to students of political communication. It will consist mostly of qualitative research and writing, with some compilation of spreadsheets eg on the debate time allotted to specific issues and candidates' usage of certain keywords.

Research Assistant Duties: Per the project description, weekly reports to me on assigned aspects of debate range articulation, issue by issue.

Number of openings: 1

Average weekly time commitment: 7-9 hours

Credit hour option*: 3 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: [email protected]

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.


Professor: Eric Schluessel

Department: History

Research Title: Mapping Xinjiang, China, Farm By Farm

Description: The overall project is an economic history of Xinjiang, China, the Uyghur homeland, as seen from the perspective of ordinary farmers. In order to achieve this goal, we must first understand how land was bought, sold, inherited, or otherwise transferred between people. This stage of the project involves processing and comparing thousands of Chinese language land records from the oasis of Turpan in the 1880s and 1920s. The record for each plot of land is entered into a database, along with information about its owner, size, and position. Adjacent parcels of land are then mapped, producing snapshots of landholding in individual villages. Then these records are connected with legal documents, and compared across time, to tell a broader story of economic change. This is the first project ever to attempt an economic history of Xinjiang from below, which will shed light on a vitally important but almost completely unexplored aspect of life in the Uyghur homeland.

Research Assistant Duties: The assistant will enter Chinese-language records into an Excel database, following a provided model. When each village is complete, we will work together to solve the puzzle of how these parcels of land fit together. We will draw a map of that village, again following a provided model. I welcome any insights from mathematics, geography, economics, or any other perspective that the student brings to the data. We will write up our findings in brief at the end of the semester.

The assistant will gain valuable practice in reading Chinese handwriting and an introduction to conducting historical research on China, 1877-1933.

Number of openings: 1

Average weekly time commitment: 7-9 hours

Credit hour option*: 3 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: [email protected]

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.


Professor: Kathleen Roche

Department: Prevention & Community Health

Research Title: Pathways to Health / Caminos al Bienestar

Description: This is a NIH-funded multi year study examining how community, family, and immigration-related factors shape family functioning and affect the health and well being of Latino/a adolescents living in a new immigrant destination. The project utilizes survey data and phone survey data for 547 mother-youth dyads.  Participants are followed longitudinally for a period of 9 years. Currently, we are collecting the 8th time point of data; a total of 13 time points will be collected.

Research Assistant Duties: The RA will have opportunities to assist with data collection activities. These include organizing and preparing mailings to send to participants; assisting with incentive tracking and distribution; sending survey reminders to youth; tracking and recording call logs. If interested, RA's may help with some data entry and simple descriptive analyses in a statisics program (this is not required).

**If the RA is fluent in Spanish, s/he also will be able to assist with conducting telephone surveys with mothers - each survey takes about 45 minutes.

Number of openings: 2

Average weekly time commitment: 7-9 hours

Credit hour option*: 3 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: [email protected]

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.
 


Professor: Sarah Shomstein

Department: Psychological and Brain Sciences

Research Title: Attentional priorities in natural scenes

Description: The project explores neural and psychological mechanisms responsible for attentional selection (our brain's ability to figure out which information to process and which to ignore)

Research Assistant Duties:

  • assist with day-to-day running of the cognitive neuroscience lab
  • assist with data collection assist with data analysis


Number of openings: 2

Average weekly time commitment: 7-9 hours

Credit hour option*: 3 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: [email protected]

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.


Professor: Dana Tai Soon Burgess

Department: Dance-Corcoran School

Research Title: El Muro-Journeys North

Description: Student would research and gather current and historical information regarding the southern border wall and immigration to the US from Latin and South America. This information will be incorporated into a new dance by the Smithsonian’s choreographer in residence, Dana Tai Soon Burgess www.dtsbdc.org

Research Assistant Duties:

  1. Create and implement a research strategy that gathers historical and contemporary perspectives on immigration laws which have affected individuals immigrating to/trying to find sanctuary in the US from Latin and South America.
  2. Translate interviewee stories from Spanish to English.
  3. Assist with the researching of and interfacing with organizations that support refugees and political Asylum seekers such as the IRC.


Number of openings: 1

Average weekly time commitment: 1-3 hours

Credit hour option*: 1 credit

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: [email protected]

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.


Professor: Catherine Forster

Department: Geological Sciences

Research Title: Documenting a New Dinosaur from South Africa

Description: Preparing and composing figures for a manuscript that describes a new dinosaur from South Africa.

Research Assistant Duties: Preparing and composing photographic figures for publication. This requires skills with Photoshop to prepare photographs, and Illustrator to compose figures. An artistic eye for composition and attention to detail are definite assets.

Number of openings: 1

Average weekly time commitment: 4-6 hours

Credit hour option*: 2 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: [email protected]

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.


Professor: Janet Steele

Department: SMPA

Research Title: Visual Misinformation in Global Perspective

Description: I am one of a team of researchers working on a project that utilizes survey experiments to test whether visual memes are more effective than text in leading users to recall factually inaccurate information, believe that information, and share it online. It also examines the role of different digital platforms (Facebook versus WhatsApp) in either helping or hindering the sharing of misinformation, as well as how particular institutional and social characteristics shape these phenomena. The project involves analysis of data from eight different countries on five continents, and I have agreed to do the analysis of Indonesia.

We have completed the initial phase, in which we identified specific memes involving misinformation that have spread on Facebook and WhatsApp, and developed survey questions and translated them into Indonesian. An international research company will conduct the survey experiment, and I will later be asked to analyze the results and write the narrative for the section on Indonesia.

Please note that applications for this position must be submitted by September 6.

Research Assistant Duties: Please note:  knowledge of Indonesian is NOT required for this project.

I need someone who can help me find photos that illustrate our 8 different issues/topics.  For each of the issues, four the images must be "high arousal," and four must be "low arousal," meaning that we will need a total of 64 images.  Although this sounds simple, it is actually quite time-consuming, as there are a number of other requirements. For each of the 8 issues we identified the images need to be:

1. Either copyright-free or published by a reputable news organization that credits the copyright owners so we can credit them again.

2. The images do not have to come from Indonesia or from Indonesian news sources, as long as they are good illustrations of the misinformation we are showing participants.

Number of openings: 2

Average weekly time commitment: 4-6 hours

Credit hour option*: 2 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: [email protected]

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.


Professor: Celeste Arrington

Department: Political Science

Research Title: From Manners to Rules: Activism for Legalistic Policy Solutions in South Korea and Japan

Description: This book project investigates the legalistic turn in governance in South Korea and Japan through paired case studies related to disability rights and tobacco control. It argues that activists are an under-studied force behind increasingly legalistic regulatory approaches, especially in Korea. Using mostly qualitative comparative analysis and content analysis methods to conduct the paired case studies, this research relies heavily on Korean and Japanese government and social movement publications. It engages with comparative studies of the judicialization or legalization of politics and how social movements mix contentious, legislative, bureaucratic, media, and judicial channels when seeking to influence policy outcomes.

Research Assistant Duties: Korean and/or Japanese language fluency would be helpful. The RA would help code legislative minutes, policy deliberation council reports, social movement activity reports, and media coverage. In addition, the RA would gather and summarize legal scholarship related to specific regulatory changes and code court rulings (where available).

Without Korean and/or Japanese fluency, the RA would conduct comparative research into specific regulations cross-nationally (e.g., rules on indoor smoking in public places or accessible public transportation) and summarize English-language literature regarding explanations for legalistic approaches to governance. Relevant literatures include the judicialization or legalization of politics, social movements, tobacco control, and disability rights.

Number of openings: 1

Average weekly time commitment: 7-9 hours

Credit hour option*: 3 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: [email protected]

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.


Professor: Arie Dubnov

Department: History

Research Title: Glocal Encounters: VIP Intellectuals visiting Israel during
the 1960s-70s

Description: The aim of my research project is to offer a historical portrait of Israeli culture in the late 1960s and early 1970s. It examines a young generation of Israeli authors, poets, visual artists, musicians, dramaturges, intellectuals, and more, and while it offers a snapshot at Israeli history during a short but dramatic period (especially between the 1967 Six Day War and the 1973 Yom Kippur War) it also provides a generational portrait on the Israel’s Jewish “baby boomers” (i.e., artists and creative minds born during the post-World War II baby boom). More specifically, it shows how the local Israeli bohemia attempted to forge its own identity vis-à-vis youth elsewhere, and in particular in relation to the anti-war and counterculture movements and the student revolts of 1968. In that respect, the research uses a glocal perspective and framing, combining the local and the global dimension of these cultural encounters.
As part of that project, I would like to look closely at several significant intellectual encounters between notable non-Israeli intellectuals and artists who came to visit Israel and the local Israeli intelligentsia. Among those “VIP visits” are included a well-documented visit of the legendary French philosophers Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir, the influential “Beat” poet and writer Allen Ginsberg, the German-born critical theorist Herbert Marcuse and the political theorist Hannah Arendt, the American filmmaker, essayist, and political activist Susan Sontag and more.

The Research Assistant (RA) would assist me in finding additional traces and records of these and other visits through sifting through historical newspapers, published biographies, memoirs and unpublished private papers and archives in the US and Europe. Ideally, the RAship fits students passionate about literature, culture (including pop culture and youth culture), and intellectual history, who feels comfortable conducting empirical research using offline library resources alongside online databases, digitized newspapers, and archives.


Research Assistant Duties: The Research Assistant’s (RA) main tasks will include:
1.      Finding and reading historical newspapers that report about these visits.
2.      Finding and reading books (biographies, autobiographies, memoirs) that shed additional light on these visits.
3.      Communicate with archives and cultural institutions (in the US, Europe and Israel) and ordering scans of documents related to the research.
4.      Research, find and reproduce rare materials from the Library of Congress and/or GWU’s Gelman Library.

Required skills:
•       Excellent oral and written communication skills.
•       Ability to conduct research using online databases (JSTOR, historical newspapers and more).
•       Familiarity with Dropbox and Google drive.
•       Holding a Library of Congress reader’s card.

Knowledge of Hebrew and/or Israeli culture is preferable but not required. Passion about the subject is far more important. Particular preference would be given to students interested in working on the intersection of history and literature.

I am open to the possibility of an independent study as well that will allow the student to gain extra credit, after writing his/her own research essay on the subject.

Number of openings: 2

Average weekly time commitment: 4-6 hours

Credit hour option*: 2 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: [email protected]

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.


Professor: Yvonne Captain
Department: RGSLL
Research Project Title: Editing for "African Migrations:  Challenges and Coping Strategies"
Research Project Description: This is work for an co-edited, multi-disciplinary volume related to recent African Migration.  The chapters of the book are from experts in their respective fields.  Contributors hail from different parts of the world. Research Assistant

Duties: Seeking a student with excellent skills in the English language for help in preparing a co-edited book of essays related to African migration.  The chapters are mostly finished manuscripts that require the same formatting according to APA guidelines. There are four additional chapters at different stages of development. The student will work with the professor and “whip the manuscripts into shape” using MS Word “trackchanges” and other readily availalbe editing tools.  These will not be major changes to the essays, but rather minor adjustments that eventually see each chapter in conformity with the other chapters.  Via email, there will be some contact with the individual authors. An estimated 6-9 hours a week during busy period and 2-4 hours during down period.  Up to a certain point, the time band is flexible.
Number of position openings: 1
Weekly time commitment: 7-9 hours
Credit hour option*: 3 credits

Submit Letter/Cover Letter to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.


Professor: Ellen Yeung

 

Department: Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences

Title: Investigation of the Relationship between Substance Use and Pain

Description: Approximately 1 in 5 Americans, suffer from severe and/or persistent pain. Substance use/misuse and chronic pain frequently co-occur. Multiple studies have revealed an association between them showing the onset of substance use/misuse precedes people’s reports of chronic pain in some populations, and vice versa in other populations. You may wonder why this is the case. Do current substance users or people with a history of substance use/misuse show higher pain sensitivity? Do they report a heightened analgesic effect that in turn leads to greater likelihood of self-medication with alcohol, tobacco, cannabis, or opioids? Would chronic pain patients who rate higher on certain personality traits and/or loneliness be more at risk of substance use disorders? Do these devastating health conditions manifest similar physiological dysregulation that has been implicated in the brain reward and stress pathways? If you are interested in seeking answers to these questions, please consider joining my scientific effort to help people manage their substance use and chronic pain. I am recruiting conscientious and motivated undergraduate students to work as research assistants in my lab.

Duties: In this role, you will gain experience in recruiting and interviewing participants in the community, preparing and administering study materials, and managing electronic diary studies. Furthermore, during research assistant training, we will discuss theories of substance use disorders and chronic pain, as well as the research methodology and statistical techniques that allow us to address the research questions relevant to their co-occurrence. Together, we will review the literature, develop and organize a digital library, and code the research studies. In the future, when in person training is permitted, you will have the opportunity to get an insider's look at, and hands-on experience with, the process of assessing several physiological indices via state-of-the-art equipment and software. In short, you will gain important research skills highly valued in graduate and medical programs, while making a meaningful contribution to the accumulation of knowledge on substance use and chronic pain.

Time commitment: 6-8 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 2

Number of openings: 3

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.


Professor: Declan Cullen

Department: Geography

Title: Automated Vehicles and Smart City policy in Washington D.C.

Description: This project corresponds with a chapter in book project I am currently working on with two colleagues. The book examines how "Big Tech" influences urban politics, urban policy, and urban futures. Through the lens of Uber it examines how tech companies transform cities and what that means for urban life.

Duties: The research assistant will aid in collecting relevant media reporting on the topic of autonomous vehicles in Washington D.C. They will also do a policy analysis of existing legislation on Autonomous Vehicles and examine the minutes and meetings of the Mayor's Autonomous Vehicles Working Group.

Time commitment: 1-3 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 1

Number of openings: 1

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.


Professor: Janet Lewis

Department: Political Science

Title: Rebel Group Formation in Africa

Description: Because the clandestine, initial phases of insurgency typically leave just a faint trace in news reports and thus in conflict datasets, most systematic conflict research examines conflicts only after rebel groups have already formed and committed substantial violence. This project aims to builds a dataset of dozens of African rebel groups – as close as possible to a complete list of contemporary rebel organizations (formed since 1997) that have committed at least one act of violence against an African state – which allows for systematic analysis of rebel group formation there. The dataset is near completion; the RAs will complete the research and conduct spot checks of previously-collected data to ensure clarity of supporting materials for future researchers who will use the dataset.

Duties: 1) Identifying sources of information about rebellion in Africa and analyzing them. especially by applying criteria laid out in a detailed codebook.
2) Reading and revising prior RA's documentation in support of their codings to ensure accuracy and clarity.

Throughout, the RAs will need to be independent and detail-oriented. They will learn a great deal about the initial phases of rebellion in Africa, and about the process of building a dataset.

Time commitment: 7-9 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.


Professor: Shirley Graham

Department: Elliott School of International Affairs

Title: Military Gender Advisors

Description: There are two projects currently requiring strong researchers/honors students in the Gender Equality Initiative in International Affairs (GEIA) at the GW, Elliott School.
US Military Gender Advisors, discussing the opportunities and barriers to them delivering their programs on gender equality within the security sector in fragile contexts. This project uses qualitative research methodologies such as narrative analysis and grounded theory. The outcome of this research will be the content for an academic peer-reviewed journal article and for presentation at the ISA Conference in 2021.


Duties:  Transcribe interviews and support PI with analysis and writing of research report.

Time commitment: 1-3 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 1

Number of openings: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.


Professor: Iris Malone

Department: Political Science/International Affairs

Title: Mapping Militants

Description:  The project focuses on researching and writing short profiles about the history and evolution of contemporary militant groups in the United States and around the world. Students are tasked with researching information about the group’s formation, organizational structure, ideological goals, and ties with other militant actors using a codebook, sample cases, and open-source online resources. Students then write short historical narratives about each militant group to trace its history and key facts.

The profiles will be used in two ways. First, they will help the professor in an ongoing project to understand the causes of militant group formation and how organizational features affect violent dynamics. Second, they will be used to identify and facilitate the creation of more in-depth profiles for publication on the Mapping Militants Project website. The latter receives approximately 35,000 website hits per month and is routinely cited by academics, journalists, and policy-makers.

Duties: 

  • Research contemporary militant groups in the United States and around the world using a combination of open-source intelligence resources, think tank reports, books, scholarly journals, news articles, and existing conflict datasets
  • Identify, where possible, approximately two dozen pieces of historical information across five different issue areas for each assigned militant group
  • Write short 1-2 page encyclopedic profiles summarizing the history and evolution of each militant group. Summarize and contextualize different campaign dynamics in relation to country-level events
  • Meet with professor regularly to review progress, discuss cases, and make any necessary revisions.


Time commitment: 4-6 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 2

Number of openings: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.


Professor: Melissa Keeley
Department: Geography

Title: Public Perceptions of Green Infrastructure and Sustainability in DC and Philadelphia

Description: My research broadly is on urban sustainability, and specifically
looks at new responses that cities are taking to challenges such as climate
change. Increasingly, cities are recognizing that "green infrastructure"
(that is street trees, green roofs, permeable pavements, parks, rain gardens)
can help with multiple problems simultaneously--like managing stormwater,
reducing the urban heat island effect, providing habitat to wildlife, and
improving the quality of life for city residents. For these reasons, green
infrastructure has been identified as a sustainability best practice.
However, it is not clear that the public--and certainly not all of the
public--sees green infrastructure that way. It is associated with increase
storm water management fees, is very visible throughout the city, and may to
be understood or a welcome addition in all neighborhoods. Additionally, it is
associated by some with neighborhood gentrification--so there are significant
equity concerns as well.

This project will use content analysis (a method of systematically collecting
information from texts) to better understand public perceptions of green
infrastructure in DC and Philadelphia--two cities that have developed
green-infrastructure intensive approaches and where  gentrification and green
infrastructure equity concerns are significant. Our goal is to better
understand how green infrastructure is understood by the public, the
benefits, disadvantages, and challenges that are illuminated through
newspaper sources. I hope that this work will help public officials both
better design green infrastructure programs considering perspectives of
residents and improve community outreach and messaging approaches involving
green infrastructure.

Duties: Learn content analysis best practices and gain a background in green
infrastructure through readings and team discussion. Then, participate in the
data collection process by systematically reading through newspaper articles
to assess the way green infrastructure is discussed within these sources.
Participate in quantitative and qualitative data analysis.

Time commitment: 7-9 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 5

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  

Professor: Chris Warshaw
Department: Political Science

Title: Partisanship in American Schools: Does the Partisan Composition of Local School Boards Affect Education?

Description: I am starting a new research project that will examine the
consequences of the partisan and ideological composition of local school
boards. In this project, we will gather information about local school board
elections.  We will also gather information about educational outcomes.  This
will enable us to assess whether the partisan and ideological composition of
local school boards affects educational outcomes, such as student/teacher
ratios, teacher salaries, or student achievement. We will also examine
whether the institutional structure of school boards matters.

Duties: 1) Figuring out basic information on the duties of school board
members and the size of school boards for the 200 largest school districts in
the United States
2) Researching school board elections
3) Researching the availability of educational outcome data
4) Researching prior literature on school board elections

Time commitment: 7-9 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  

Professor: Gina Adam
Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering Department

Title: Smart robotics with memristor-based neural network control

Description: Training of artificial intelligence systems is consumes massive
amounts of computing resources which is a challenge for autonomous systems,
like robots and self-driving cars. New neuro-inspired hardware alternatives
are necessary to keep up with the increasing demand in complexity and energy
efficiency. Neuromorphic hardware based on emerging analog memory
technologies, like memristors, show promise for dense energy efficient
systems given their ultra-scalable footprint and better energy/bit
consumption.

In this project, the student(s) will develop a small robot that implements an
inverted pendulum control using a memristor-based neural network. The
student(s) will work using existing software and hardware platforms
previously developed in the group. The goal is to demonstrate training of the
memristor-based neural network and robotic control in simulation and in
experiments. This project is part of an on-going work in collaboration with a
national lab and a company, so the student(s) will be part of a large team
and learn a variety of interdisciplinary skills, from emerging nanodevices
like memristors to machine learning and robotics. Writing and presentation
skills will also be acquired, as the students will be encouraged to present
at conferences and submit journal papers. Students who have prior programming
or robotics experience are strongly encouraged to apply. The number of course
credits is flexible and depends on how many hours the student can dedicate to
the project.

Duties: - Improve the design and implementation of inverted pendulum
balancing robot
- Implement neural network algorithms using memristors models in C++ for
robotic control
- Establish communication between the robot and an FPGA board
- Demonstrate the neural network algorithm for robot control in simulation
and experiment
- Prepare student research papers, presentations and posters for journals or
conferences

Time commitment: 7-9 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  

Professor: Alessandra Fenizia
Department: Economics

Title:  Preventive Care in the Times of COVID

Description: The current pandemic has reshaped our lives in ways we did not anticipate and forced us to change our routines and plans. Most commentators have focused on the devastating effects of the virus and how to tackle the pandemic effectively. Less attention has been devoted how the epidemic has shifted attention and resources away from other realms of medicine. Anecdotal evidence suggests that many patients have skipped their routine checkups and avoided visiting the hospital or their primary physician unless it was truly necessary. What is the value of preventive care? What is the impact of skipping or postponing a routine checkup? How does this translate in short-term savings and long-term costs for the healthcare system?

Duties: review of the literature on preventive care, proof editing preliminary drafts, collecting qualitative and quantitative data

Time commitment: 4-6 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 2

Number of openings: 1

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  

Professor: Harris Mylonas

Department: Political Science

Title: Nationalism

Description: I’m writing a book on Nationalism for Cambridge University Press.

Duties: This project will involve reading articles and books and writing up
memos summarizing their main findings, focusing in particular on the impact
that nationalism has on other phenomena or processes. Also for each reading
we will be focusing how the authors conceptualize, define, and "measure"
nationalism. The RA will also be helping with references and citations.

Time commitment: 4-6 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 2

Number of openings: 3

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  

Professor: Mike Mochizuki
Department: History & International Affairs

Title: Memory & Reconciliation in Asia Pacific

Description: Memory & Reconciliation in Asia Pacific is a research and policy program established at Sigur Center for Asian Studies at the Elliott School in 2003 by myself and Prof. Mike Mochizuki.  We have hosted lectures,
conferences, and published research findings related to historical disputes and conflict resolutions in the region. Our website (http://www.memoryreconciliation.org) provides regular updates about current events as well as new research on relevant issues. Our project is connected with the soon-to-be-founded International Association for Reconciliation Studies headquartered in Jena, Germany.

Duties: The RA is primarily responsible for collecting relevant information
from English-language sources and updating our website. The RA may be asked
to compile a report on a particular issue, and assist my ongoing research
related to memory and reconciliation. Knowledge of an Asian language is
helpful but not required.

Time commitment: 7-9 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 1

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  

Professor: Naomi Seiler
Department: Health Policy and Management

Title: Ongoing health policy research

Description: We have a great opportunity for a student to work with a team in
the Department of Health Policy and Management. Overall, we focus on legal
and policy aspects of health system changes, examining how they impact
various public health programs and issues.  Currently, our portfolio of
funders includes federal and state agencies, health care foundations,
non-profit patient advocacy groups, and health care coalitions. We work on a
broad range of public health and prevention issues, including HIV, heart
disease and stroke, mental health and substance use disorder services,
prevention and public health funding, and community prevention of asthma.  We
also do a significant amount of work on Medicaid, Medicare and marketplace
coverage, as well as new payment and service delivery models.

Duties: The research assistant would work with the two faculty members and
four senior researchers on a range of health policy research projects.  They
would conduct qualitative and policy research related to the public health
issue areas listed above.  We are all working remotely, with daily checkins.

Time commitment: 10 or more hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 1

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  

Professor: Jameta Barlow
Department: University Writing Program

Title: Womanist Characterization of African American Literature for Applied Impact

Description: In this political moment, where the pandemics of anti-Black
systems of oppression, science deniers and COVID-19, Womanism offers a lens
in which to address this culture in crisis. Defined as “a social change
perspective rooted in Black women’s and other women of color’s everyday
experiences and everyday methods of problem solving in everyday spaces,
extended to the problem of ending all forms of oppression for all people,
restoring the balance between people and the environment/nature and
reconciling human life with the spiritual dimension,” (Marparyan, 2012;
Phillips, 2006) Womanism is a transdisciplinary humanistic perspective,
epistemology and methodology that has been employed throughout the world to
address environmental issues, sexual violence and mental health, among other
social issues. This project will map seminal African American literature onto
the eight modalities characterizing Womanism, in an effort to explore the
utility of a humanistic intervention during this political moment.

There are eight modalities characterizing Womanism: self-care healing and
wellness practices, which are designed to rectify physical, emotional, mental
and spiritual practices; harmonizing and coordinating, or disposition and
activity to employ differential consciousness and move between divergent
logics and conceptual schemes; dialogue and the power of the word, to express
and establish connection and individuality as well as tension and connection;
arbitration and mediation, where conflict is transformed into peace; spiritual
activities, a socio-ecological transformational activity rooted in a
spiritual belief system including religious participation to transmutation
practices; hospitality, the transformative power of welcome that facilitates
powerful encounters; mutual aid and self-help, or everyday collective
grassroots methods garnered from life experience, wisdom, self-education and
democratic knowledge; and motherhood, a social change methodology and social
ecology that recognizes agency and interconnectivity with others.

Womanism is both interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary in its theoretical
framing, ontologies, epistemologies and methodologies. As a community
psychologist and public health scientist, I engage in Womanism modalities in
my work to disrupt cardiometabolic syndrome (e.g., diabetes, heart disease,
stroke, hypertension) among Black communities. Central to this work is my
curriculum of “writehealing” where I use writing to address self-care,
harmoninzing and coordinating and mutual aid and self-help. However, a major
gap in this work is a database of relevant African American literature that
can be utilized for intervention. This project offers a humanistic approach
for applied impact. A database that allows the user to discover African
American literature based on a Womanist modality, emotions and psychological
outcomes bridges multiple disciplinary gaps.

Duties: 1. Data mine, review, organize and characterize African American
literature according to the Womanist modality and health behavior(s)
2. Participate in weekly project meetings
3. Contribute to online database management and manuscript development

Time commitment: 7-9 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  

Professor: Patricia Phalen
Department: SMPA

Title: Hollywood & Politics: One Hundred Years of Connections (this is a working title)

Description: This project is about discovering the myriad connections between
the world of Hollywood and the world of politics.  The result will be a book
length project about these connections and how both sides influence each
other over time. Please note that this position would not begin until Spring 2021.

Duties: The most important requirements for the job are:  an interest in the
worlds of entertainment and politics; strong research skills; and a
willingness to learn.  Duties will include finding and summarizing academic
literature, keeping up with connections by reading current trade and popular
publications, and transcribing interviews.

Time commitment: 7-9 hours per week (average). Please note that this position would not begin until Spring 2021.

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 1

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]


*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  

Professor: Randi Kristensen
Department: University Writing

Title: JAMAL: Adult literacy decolonizing knowledge and activism in 1970s Jamaica 
and/or 2nd project: creating the worthy recipient in humanitarian work -- the Irish Famine

Description: 
JAMAL and adult literacy is a hybrid performance/research paper I was invited
to give at a conference on Decoloniality in the Caribbean at York University
in October 2019. Conference proceedings are being organized, and I could use
research assistance filling in more of the context and impact of JAMAL -- the
Jamaican Adult Literacy program -- from the 1980s to the present. I have some
interviews to do, but there are places in the literature where JAMAL is cited
as a model for other programs, and newspaper clippings that describe the
evolution of the program in the 2000s.

The second project is a quest for references to historical documents, or
perhaps even discovering where those historical documents live, that provide
the discourse of the worthy (or unworthy) recipient of humanitarian aid in
the era of the Irish famine. This work is prologue for a book project that is
underway amplifying local aesthetic critiques of humanitarian solutions for
structural issues in the Caribbean writ large: Jamaica, Haiti, and New
Orleans. By aesthetic critique I mean films, novels, art installations,
parades, and other artistic genres that offer an alternative narrative and
resistance to how need is constructed and met, or not.


Duties: A research assistant on both projects would be conducting literature
searches and reviews, in the first case in literacy studies and Caribbean
sources, and in the second case reading histories of the Irish Famine and the
humanitarian response to it for clues about how the Irish people were
described to potential donors, and also for clues about where those
documents, newspaper ads, letters of appeal, etc. are currently archived.

In either/both cases, a research assistant who could provide 2-3 hours of
research a week, and produce a tagged annotated bibliography of their
findings would be a tremendous assist this semester. They would gain research
skills in areas and source material that are under-researched, and both
projects engage with questions of how social change is or is not produced.

Time commitment: 1-3 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 1

Number of openings: 1

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  

Professor: Sanjay Pandey
Department: Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration

Title: Advancing anti-racism and anti-sexism through scholarship

Description: There is a need for training the next generation of scholars on anti-racism
and anti-sexism. The purpose of this project is to help students develop social science
research skills and to apply these skills to anti-racist and/or anti-sexist inquiry. Ideal
candidates will be interested in developing a scholarly understanding, working
independently, and be motivated to meet milestones as part of a structured learning
experience. Like most RA listings, this is an unpaid assistantship.


Duties include:
1) Under instructor guidance come up with a work plan and revise it, as necessary
2) Implement the plan and communicate regularly (once a week or once every two
weeks) with the instructor and act on the feedback
3) Keep clear and extensive documentation of steps in the research process.


Time commitment: 8-10 hours per week (average) for a semester

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  

Professor: Maggie Chen
Department: Economics/ESIA

Title: Foreign Powers, Trademark Protection, and Firm Growth in Shanghai's
Concession Era

Description: In this paper, we investigate the influence of IP institutions,
specifically, trademark law on industrial and firm growth by exploiting
unique historical events in the 1870-1945 Republican China and a series of
newly digitized micro-level datasets in Shanghai that provide rare,
first-hand insights into how firms operated and interacted in arguably one of
the most volatile and complex periods of history.

Duties: data entry and construction, literature search, case study, and data
analysis

Time commitment: 7-9 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to[email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  

Professor: Kathryn Kleppinger
Department: French

Title: The Marseille Mosaic: A Transdisciplinary Study of a City at the Crossroads of Cultures

Description: I am currently working on a publication about the French city
Marseille. It is both the second-largest and also the most heavily
immigrant-populated city in France, yet it has escaped many of the
difficulties faced by other French cities. It has neither produced nor been
the target of a homegrown terrorist, and its urban institutions have been
much more welcoming of ethnic and religious differences. I am co-editing a
volume of essays on this topic and also writing my own essay on the current
Marseille rap scene. I am exploring how Marseille-based rappers promote a
different vision of French identity through their music and social media
presence.

Duties: I would use an assistant to help me read the lyrics and social media
postings of prominent Marseille-based rappers. I will provide the names and
albums and would ask the assistant to summarize the songs as well as flag
relevant social media posts and newspaper articles. The main qualification
required for this position is an advanced knowledge of the French language,
as all of the reading would be conducted in French. I put 4-6 hours per week
for my time commitment, but I am happy to adjust up or down depending on the
needs of the RA.

Time commitment: 4-6 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 2

Number of openings: 1

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  

Professor: Douglas Boyce
Department: Music

Title: digital and social media platforming of performance recording archive

Description: As a composer, my 30 years ot creative live have produced a
large archive of scores, recordings, programs, interviews, etc);  I have also
run a nonporofit performing organization for 20 years and so there is
similarly expansive collection of performance recordings both of major works
of the repertoire, and numerous world premieres.  One of my current projects
is both cataloging extant works, and 'platforming' video and audio
recordings.  Depending on the skills of the research assitant, this could
involved audio or video editing, or even updating musical scores.

I have indicated a 4 weekly our minimum with 2 slots, but both factors are
variable – this is a very large collection (and one that continues to
grow), but also some of the needed tasks are quite simple and value could be
gained from even a few hours or assistance a week.  Similarly, I have
indicated a 1 credit option for students, since that seems most likely, but
this could easily becamse a 3-credit independent project cataloging
performance culture in NY in the last quarter decade.

As I have worked with many leading artists, the assitant will also have to
communicate with leading performers, presenters, and recording labels.
Duties:
  • organize and integrate multiple audio, visiual recordings and scores from multiple drives
  • continue the ongoing cotaloging of works and performances into pre-existning system
  • aid in the uploading of some of these materials in to various platforms (youtube, soundcloud, etc)
  • communicate with collaborators, presenters and publishers.
  • if the research assistant has particular skills, this work could include video and audio editing score editing

Time commitment: 4-6 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 1

Number of openings: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to[email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  

Professor: Luis Ballesteros
Department: International Business
Research Project Title: The effects of disasters on entrepreneurship and innovation
Research Project Description:
If engaging in innovative behavior and business creation entails risk
tolerance and experiencing episodes of high uncertainty can alter risk
preferences, then uncertainty shocks may explain the geographical
distribution of innovation and entrepreneurship.
The project's goal will be to evaluate these relationships. The first step
follows up analyses on a decade-long database of inventor-specific patent
filings in the United States. This presents evidence that U.S. counties
exposed to the consequences of Hurricane Katrina experienced increases on the
average likelihood of patent filings, which are not explained by a set of
alternative factors.

We then will use a survey representative of the national population to map
the relationship between disasters, risk aversion, and entrepreneurship.
Research Assistant Duties:
1.      Writing and running statistical models and interpreting results.
2.      Cleaning and coding databases.
3.      Using natural language processing for obtaining data.
4.      Running machine learning algorithms.
5.      Automating tasks via Python.
6.      Producing visual and written reports on findings.
Number of position openings: 2
Weekly time commitment: 7-9 hours
Credit hour option: 3 credits

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  

Professor: Chris Warshaw
Department: Political Science

Title: The Ideological Positions of Democratic and Republican State Party
Platforms in the United States

Description: In this project, I am working with a team of researchers to code
the ideological positions of Democratic and Republican state parties in all
fifty states over the past 50 years using 1,800 individual party platforms
from 1960-2016.  These platforms include the state parties' positions on
dozens of policy issues, including gay rights, abortion, climate change, gun
controls, and many more.  This project will shed new light on the historical
development of party positions.  It will also speak to debates about
polarization and representation (i.e., the links between public opinion and
political parties).

Duties: The research assistant(s) will read Democratic and Republican state
party platforms to help me code the issue positions of Democratic and
Republican state parties in the United States over the past 50 years. They
will code each state party's position on issues like gun control, abortion,
climate change, taxes, women's rights, and many more. This project will give
research assistant(s) the opportunity to learn more about the development of
the American party system. It also give them the opportunity to learn more
about dozens of policy issues, and the positions of political parties on
these issues.

Time commitment: 7-9 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 4

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  

Professor: Harris Mylonas
Department: Political Science

Title: Greek and Cypriot Political Developments

Description: Conduct background research for the report on Greece that I contribute annually to the European Journal of Political Research.

Duties: Summarize events, find reliable sources to cite, edit text. 
Time commitment: 1-3 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 1

Number of openings: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  

Professor: Graciela Kaminsky
Department: Economics

Title: Two Hundred Years of Financial Globalization

Description: This project compares two episodes of financial globalization.
The first episode started with the end of the Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815).
The end of these wars fueled a reduction of public spending and a bonanza in
international lending as interest rates in England and France sharply
declined.  This episode ended with the Great Depression in 1931.  It is at
the onset of the Great Depression that governments around the world erected
barriers to capital mobility in their effort to eliminate volatility in
financial markets.  International capital markets basically disappeared.
The second episode of financial globalization restarted with the collapse of
the Bretton Woods System in the early 1970s.   As exchange rates started to
fluctuate, governments around the world could implement an independent
monetary policy without the need of capital controls.  Controls on capital
mobility were abandoned and international capital flows restarted.
This project examines the characteristics of international capital flow booms
and busts in these two episodes of financial globalization.  Are capital
flows becoming more unstable?  Do all capital flow bonanzas end in financial
crises?  Do Central Banks in the financial center fuel volatility in capital
flows to the periphery?  What type of shocks trigger turmoil in international
capital markets?
The project involves the creation of two databases for the first episode of
financial globalization.  For the first database, students collect
information on international capital flows using data on bonds and shares
issued in the financial centers of that time: London, Paris, Berlin, Hamburg,
Frankfurt, and New York.  For the second database, students collect data on
prices of government bonds in the financial centers and data on a variety of
news using the digital collection of the London Times and the Economist
during the 19th century and early 20th century.



Duties: Students may be involved in the creation of the two databases.  The
data on bonds and shares issued in the financial centers as well as the data
on prices of government bonds is in photos taken in archives.  The data on
economic, political, and financial news is collected from the London Times
(for the years 1820 to 1842) and from the Economist (for the years 1843 to
1931).  Students will work under the supervision of faculty and periodical
meetings will be set to help the students in their work.



Time commitment: 10 or more hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 3

Number of openings: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  

Professor: Ahmed Louri

Department: Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Title: High-performance, Power-efficient, and Reliable Computer Architecture
Design

Description: High performance computing architectures and technologies
(HPCAT) lab, led by Prof. Ahmed Louri, is a world-class research laboratory.
HPCAT lab investigates novel parallel computer architectures and technologies
which deliver high reliability, high performance, and energy-efficient
solutions to important application domains and societal needs. The research
has far-reaching impacts on the computing industry and society at large.
Current research projects include: (1) the use of machine learning techniques
for designing energy-efficient, reliable multicore architectures, (2)
scalable accelerator-rich reconfigurable heterogeneous architectures, (3)
emerging interconnect technologies (photonic, wireless, RF, hybrid) for
network-on-chips (NoCs) & embedded systems, (4) future parallel computing
models and architectures including Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs), Deep
Neural Networks (DNNs), near data computing, approximate computing, and (5)
cloud and edge computing.

Duties: A research assistant is expected, on a routine basis, to be able to:
(1)     perform administrative and research tasks under the direction of faculty
member or senior research assistants;
(2)     assist with experiments, simulations, and coding;
(3)     perform literature searches, review content, and prepare written
summaries;
(4)     prepare drafts for articles, reports, or presentations.

Time commitment: 10 or more hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 0

Number of openings: 3

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  

Professor: Jozef Przytycki

Department: Mathematics

Title: Knot Theory, assisting in editing, programming,  and research

Description: Knot Theory is a discipline of modern mathematics, part of
topology (geometria situs). Student(s) will assist me with editing programing and
doing research in Knot Theory.

Duties: Students under my supervision will be involved in tasks as below:

1. Student would assist in preparing/editing research paper for arXiv
submission (and eventual publication). Student has to learn LaTeX and how to
draw figures in xfig or other similar
program.

2. Many invariants of graphs and knots require pattern testing which require
to wrote simple (or not that simple) programs. Also programs are needed to
analyze simple algebraic structures related to knots.

I assume student would assist me 4-6 hours a week (2 credit) but I am
flexible, so more, or less is possible.

Time commitment: 4-6 hours per week (average)
Note: 2 openings!
Credit hour option*: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  

Professor: Alex Pyron
Department: Biological Science

Title: Species Delimitation in Desmognathus Salamanders

Description:
The Dusky Salamanders, genus Desmognathus, are one of the most diverse and
abundant animals in the eastern forests of the United States. They are
classic study organisms for ecology and behavior. Despite their visibility
and imperilment, we know little about their genetic diversity and
evolutionary history. While there are only 21 currently named species, recent
work using DNA sequencing has revealed at least 45 potential species, which
would more than double the size of the group.


Duties: The research assistant will work with me to collect data and build a
computational model to distinguish between cryptic species of Desmognathus
salamander. Classes in ecology/evolution and experience with statistics are a
plus.

Time commitment: 1-3 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 1

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  

Professor: David Mitchell
Department: English

Title: Disposable Humanity (feature-length documentary film)

Description: "Disposable Humanity" consists of three story strands that
create a braid across history and culture in relationship to disabled people
and their treatment in Nazi Germany during World War II and into the present.
The film will: 1) document the Nazi medical mass murder of 300,000+ “mental
patients” in psychiatric institutions (referred to as Aktion T4); 2)
examine the growing efforts in Germany and elsewhere (including the United
States, Poland, Austria, Czech Republic, and Italy) to commemorate and
memorialize the victims; 3) explore the history of our personal family
journeys undertaken as disabled people to visit these memorial sites since
the late 1990s.  Thus, the planned film will interweave history, culture, and
disability experience into its effort to make visible a forgotten and/or
erased aspect of Holocaust history.

Duties: Research assistants will assist with tracking down key historical
documents, photos, film clips, permissions related to the illustration of key
documentary film themes, topics, and interview b-roll materials. Each
assistant will be given a key theme to track down the best illustrative
documents -- for instance, one RA might watch all of the propaganda films
created around the sterilizations and, ultimately, murder of disabled people
institutionalization during World War II, select best clips to illustrate
ideas, and track down appropriate permissions related to the use of desired
materials in the final documentary film.  Another student would transcribe
remaining interview transcripts and analyze the interview discussions with
respect to key themes covered (grass roots preservation of historical T4
locations, selection process, memorialization efforts, reparations advocacy
efforts, etc.). A third RA would research key documents such as photos of
Himmler visiting the first gassing facility at Poznan, Poland, Medical
meldobogen forms for gassing selections in Berlin, biographical victim data
available on websites (for example, gedenkort-T4.com; YadVashem.org),
physician and medical personnel trial transcripts and photos/film, etc. The
objective is to employ students in important archival work that goes into the
crafting of a feature-length film documentary
Number of Openings: 3

Time commitment: 4-6 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  

Professor: Diego Abente Brun

Department: Elliott School of International Affairs

Title: The Foreign of Brazil: From the Discourse to the Facts

Description: This project consists of following up the foreign policy
decisions and positions of the Bolsanaro government and explore the
congruence/incongruence between words and deeds. Especial emphasis will be
paid to relations with Argentina. It implies also to compare and contrast his
government's foreign policy with that of previous governments and includes
the analysis of the role of key institutions, chiefly Itamaraty, but also
private actors such as business associations, the Congress, civil society
organizations and the media.


Duties: 1. To identify key issue-areas.( In close consultation with the
Instructor)
2.  To collect data and review the literature. (Portuguese and Spanish
reading language proficiency required)
3. To trace and underline the difference and similarities with previous
official positions.
4. To explore the likely course of events in the future.
5. To conclude with a summary of the key findings, the risks and
opportunities they offer, and policy recommendations for other foreign actors
such as the United States, Europe,  and regional actores.
6. The project will be discussed with the instructor and may be adjusted
based on the student's interests.

Time commitment: 4-6 hours per week (average)

Credit hour option*: 2

Submit Cover Letter/Resume to: [email protected]

*If credit is sought, all registration deadlines and requirements must be met.  

Professor: Melissa Keeley

Department: Geography

Title: Sustainability and Green Infrastructure in Shrinking Cities (those facing economic and population decline)

Description: This summer, I would like to work with a small virtual research team to explore how cities facing economic and population decline are using or can use green infrastructure (which I think of as open space, parks, urban agriculture, trees, wetland systems etc.) in their pursuit of sustainability and, for instance, to stabilize vacant land. Students will help with an annotated bibliography/ background research on this topic, which will examine cities globally. Students may also choose a city to focus on--identifying grey (governmental) and other literature on this topic. At this point, I know that several cities in Japan, Portugal, Germany and many post-Soviet states are on my list of interest, so students with working knowledge of these languages could also utilize these language skills. Students would work virtually and largely independently through the summer, and our research group will meet virtually once or twice a week. I will ask students to dedicate 10-15 hours a week to this project, though students determine their own work schedule. (Students can certainly take some weeks off for vacation).

Research Assistant Duties: Conduct an annotated bibliography/ background research on specific topics. Learn advanced literature search techniques. Develop key skills in organizing group research projects.

Number of openings: 10

Average weekly time commitment: 10+ hours

Credit hour option*: 3 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: [email protected]

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.
 


Professor: Melissa Keeley

 

Department: Geography

Title: Evaluating Bioswales in DC: How do they contribute to stormwater management, climate change adaptation, and community wellbeing?

Description: This summer, I am looking for student help in developing a long-term research project that will follow the environmental performance and public of rain gardens (bioswales) across each of DC’s eight Wards. Bioswales are a new, naturalistic technology that many hope will help the city manage stormwater, prepare for climate change and even improve air quality in the city. This study is meant to understand how these technologies actually function in the urban landscape. For instance: How well do they function over time? Are they appropriately maintained or do they become an eyesore? Are they understood and perceived as an amenity by the community? Are they perceived as part of a gentrification trend?

Research Assistant Duties: I would like to find a team of 2-3 students, working in DC over the summer, who will need to coordinate their schedules to work on this project. Students will use map and data from the city to identify the locations of bioswales across the city. This data is imperfect. Students will travel in a team walking, using public transportation, or personal bikes or cars to visit each bioswale, confirm its location and accessibility, and collect basic data. Students will develop skills in teamwork, organization, and time management. Students will need to manage large quantities of data and shared documents. (Mapping skills are great, but not necessary). Students will use this data to help determine the bioswales that will be included in the long term study and--time permitting--may also collect data for the first year.

Number of openings: 3

Average weekly time commitment: 10+ hours

Credit hour option*: 3 credits

Submit Resume/Cover Letter to: [email protected]

*If seeking academic credit, you must complete an Honors Contract.